Ports

President Obama has signed "a bipartisan $12.3 billion water bill that will help improve harbors, waterways, levees, and ecosystems across the United States," according to an article by Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane.
Jun 10, 2014   Brookings: The Avenue
Michael Lind argues that the version of the nation's infrastructure priorities we've been sold is a fallacy, and he has some suggestions for the kind of infrastructure we really need.
May 14, 2012   Salon.com
In spite of doubts about economic viability, port cities on the Atlantic scramble to make room for mega cargo ships, Curtis Tate reports.
May 5, 2012   McClatchy
While the rest of the city's waterfronts are to be developed as public promenades, much of Brooklyn wants to retain its previous industrial uses. Liana Grey reports.
Nov 5, 2011   Real Estate Weeky
Congressional support for transportation and infrastructure projects has traditionally been bipartisan. In an interview, Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon discusses how political tantrums in Congress may handicap the US in the long run.
Oct 10, 2011   The Planning Report
Florida isn't getting high speed rail, but it will soon have a deeper port that's able to accept more shipments.
Mar 20, 2011   Transportation Nation
Ahead of the 2016 Olympics, the host city of Rio de Janeiro is embarking on a massive redevelopment plan in its decaying port area.
Feb 21, 2011   Xinhua
A group of researchers and activists met recently to discuss the role of goods movement and logistics in and around ports, and how the industry contributes to local pollution problems and skews highway spending.
Oct 30, 2010   Streetsblog
Major hubs of transportation and logistics are planning major capital investments in Southern California over the next several years.
Aug 9, 2010   The Planning Report
A new linear park project near L.A.'s port seeks to ride the success of New York City's High Line park.
Jul 2, 2010   The Architect's Newspaper
The single largest source of air pollution in Southern California are the Ports of LA and Long Beach. Environmentalists, environmental justice advocates, and Teamsters are working together to replace offending diesel drayage trucks.
Mar 1, 2010   The New York Times - Business