Culture

According to Aaron M. Renn, left-leaning urbanists chafe against a regulatory culture their ideology supports. Favoring "regulation for thee but not for me," they want to bend the rules, but only for enterprises they like.
Yesterday   City Journal
What's in a name? Apparently, reports Kim Severson, some not-so-subtle reminders of a segregated American landscape. And changing them is not easy."The United States Board on Geographic Names, the federal agency that maintains the official names of m
Oct 7, 2011   The New York Times
An extensive profile of the recovering Iceland paints a picture of a place that is overthrowing its boom-time banker's persona and rebuilding on the unique strengths of its culture.
May 13, 2011   The New York Times
The industrialization of Hong Kong created hundreds of abandoned villages on the outskirts of the city. Today, these rural villages struggle to rejuvenate their economies and preserve their traditions.
Jan 19, 2011   The New York Times
In this reflection on the new book "Los Angeles in Maps", James Rojas wonders what shape the city will take in the near and far future.
Nov 13, 2010   KCET
Seeing a marked decline in the amount of bookstores in the traditional cultural center of Paris, the city began a program to actively lure them back.
Jun 8, 2010   Guardian
<em>Fast Company</em>'s annual list of innovative cities highlights Dallas as an emerging hub of culture.
Apr 27, 2010   Fast Company
The city of Miami is the setting of a forthcoming book by novelist Tom Wolfe, whose works have come to define eras in American culture. Some say his selection of Miami as a setting shows that the melting pot city is the face of a changing America.
Apr 19, 2010   Guardian
When baseball player Johnny Damon signed a contract to play for the Detroit Tigers, his wife voiced concerns about the city not being cosmopolitan enough. This open letter to Mrs. Damon argues that the city has more going for it than many assume.
Apr 9, 2010   Model D
Some of my acquaintances believe that climate change may end human life (or at least civilization) and that the only way to save humanity is to massively reduce economic growth and consumption. Other acquaintances believe that climate Blog Post
Oct 13, 2009   By Michael Lewyn
Native of the bustling United Arab Emirates are cheering the global economic slowdown, crediting it for curbing development in its cities that had been blamed for destroying much of their local heritage.
Nov 15, 2008   The New York Times