Pedestrian

November 23, 2015, 8am PST
"We're investing in walkability," always sounds like an encouraging tagline from local governments...or does it?
PlaceShakers
April 11, 2014, 6am PDT
The concept of the flâneur was created in the 19th century in response to the encroaching speed and efficiency of the Industrial Age. Can the flâneur now fashion a political response to the Age of the Automobile?
Fast Forward Weekly
March 2, 2014, 5am PST
Twenty years after the movie Speed, which took place on the Big Blue Bus, Metro rail system, and other transit facilities, Keanu Reeves and crew might not recognize L.A.'s current transit system. L.A. County planner Clement Lau surveys the changes.
UrbDeZine.com
Blog post
February 7, 2014, 1pm PST
Anti-jaywalking laws are based upon questionable assumptions.
Michael Lewyn
September 5, 2013, 9am PDT
A study finds that 20% of high school students cross the street while being distracted by a digital device.
WNYC: Transportation Nation
March 3, 2013, 9am PST
In an opinion piece for the Houston Chronicle, John Desmond discusses the findings of a ULI advisory panel tasked with developing recommendations for creating a mixed use 24-hour neighborhood in downtown's east side.
Houston Chronicle
January 17, 2013, 9am PST
Kaid Benfield proposes not only more walkable neighborhoods in the United States, where a pedestrian is struck by a vehicle every 7 minutes, but also more walking to reverse the country's alarming obesity trend.
NRDC Switchboard
December 1, 2012, 5am PST
Matt Chaban reports on the making of “the Upper East Side’s very own High Line." Current proposals seek not only to "re-pedestrianize" Park Avenue, but also to restore some of its turn of the century glory.
The New York Observer
November 29, 2012, 10am PST
Yesterday, Rep. Bill Shuster (R-PA) was named the new head of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, replacing former chair John Mica. With MAP-21 expiring in less than two years, what can rail and bike/ped advocates expect?
DC.Streetsblog
September 7, 2012, 11am PDT
Using examples of exceptional streets from diverse settings across the world, Kaid Benfield tries to tease out what makes a great city street.
Switchboard
May 3, 2012, 12pm PDT
Included in the 2005 federal transportation bill was $100 million for four regions to invest in bike and pedestrian infrastructure to determine, essentially, if they build it, will they bike and ride more and drive less. The final results are in.
Fast Lane (DOT blog)
March 8, 2012, 5am PST
David Alpert tamps down the recent enthusiasm for the coming age of the self-driving car by asking what its impact will be on pedestrians and street life.
The Atlantic Cities
September 6, 2011, 1pm PDT
Bolivia took two million cars off the street in nine cities during the "National Day of the Pedestrian." The event arrived when President Evo Morales' government plans to build a highway through the Amazon rainforest, the BBC reports.
BBC
July 11, 2010, 9am PDT
Conrad deFiebre sums up the benefits of living in a walkable neighborhood, from improved health to improved wealth, both via higher property values and less of hard-earned dollars paid out to oil and car companies.
Twin Cities Daily Planet
August 6, 2009, 12pm PDT
Secretary Ray LaHood is promoting livable communities, but the Wisconsin Department of Transportation insists that Madison's new Amtrak station should be located on the edge of town next to a big parking lot at the airport.
The Capital Times
June 12, 2009, 8am PDT
Not only is walking in Oklahoma City not encouraged, it's actually discouraged with public policy, says an urban design consultant.
News OK
June 8, 2009, 5am PDT
Starting June 6th, several streets in Brooklyn will be pedestrian- only.
STREETSBLOG.ORG
Blog post
March 31, 2008, 7pm PDT

Some transportation writers seem to believe that the interests of drivers and those of nondrivers are irreconcilable. For example, I just searched on google.com for websites using the terms “traffic calming” and “anti-automobile” together, and found over 60 such sites. But in fact, the interest of pedestrians in calmer, more walkable streets sometimes intersects (pun intended) with the interests of at least some motorists.

Michael Lewyn