Street Design

January 11, 2012, 12pm PST
A new guidebook illustrates ways to create safer streets and more livable public spaces.
Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Blog post
January 1, 2012, 3pm PST

I had heard of “dense sprawl” and “density without walkability” in the past, but before spending a week in Jerusalem last month, I had never really lived through these problems.

My parents (who I was staying with) rented a unit in a high-rise condo complex called Holyland Tower.  Although Holyland Tower was the tallest building in the area, there were numerous mid-rise buildings, and lots of two-and three-story apartment and condo buildings.  While walking through the idea, I saw nothing resembling a single-family home.  In sum, this area was a pretty dense neighborhood in a pretty dense city (Jerusalem’s overall density is roughly comparable to that of the city of San Francisco).

Michael Lewyn
November 30, 2011, 8am PST
In urban street design, a new movement known as 'shared spaces' has been emerging. This new movement "aims to reduce the dominance of cars by getting people and vehicles to share the road space," according to Walkonomics.
This Big City
October 27, 2011, 12pm PDT
Creating livable streets starts at the grassroots level by gathering support from the community. Better Blocks Philly was a project that created temporary changes to streets, promoting the concept of the "complete street" for the residents.
Project For Public Spaces
June 22, 2011, 2pm PDT
Walkability guru Dan Burden's long-preached message of pedestrian-focused planning is increasingly becoming policy in cities across the country.
The Washington Post
June 21, 2011, 12pm PDT
This episode of <em>99% Invisible</em> looks into the history of the cul-de-sac, and why its design flaws overpower its benefits.
99% Invisible
May 17, 2011, 5am PDT
Your streets could be killing you -- or at least making it harder for emergency services to reach you in times of need.
Medill National Security Zone
Blog post
July 29, 2010, 5pm PDT

A few days ago, I was in a Chicago neighborhood called Lincoln Square, on Lincoln Avenue just south of Lawrence Avenue.  Lincoln Avenue looks like many posh urban neighborhoods- narrow, walkable streets inhabited by gelato-eating, prosperous-looking people.  Even on a weeknight, the shops and streets of Lincoln Square betrayed no evidence of a recession.*

Michael Lewyn
October 18, 2009, 7am PDT
The city of St. Louis has been testing out a new sustainable streetscape design that calms traffic and helps absorb stormwater. The test run has been so well-received, the city is thinking about rolling out the design permanently.
The Architect's Newspaper
September 16, 2009, 2pm PDT
<em>Suburban Nation</em> co-author Jeff Speck cracks the new New York Street Design Manual and finds a lot of useful material and some that falls short.
Design Observer
August 20, 2009, 8am PDT
This oped takes on American street design and blames it for causing countless road injuries and deaths.
The Boston Globe
Feature
July 23, 2009, 5am PDT
Streets aren't just for driving, and cities are starting to realize it. Amber Hawkes and Georgia Sheridan explain why street design matters and where we are today in terms of designing the "street space."
Amber Hawkes
November 6, 2008, 12pm PST
On Monday, Gothamist revealed the winners of a contest to redesign the traffic-clogged intersection of 4th Avenue and 9th Street in Brooklyn.
Gothamist.com
Blog post
May 5, 2008, 8am PDT
Once every few semesters, I teach a seminar on "Sprawl and the Law." On the first day of the seminar, I ask students what "sprawl" is. After getting a variety of answers, I reveal the truth: most definitions of sprawl involve one of two separate definitions:

"Where we grow"- Sprawl as movement from the core to the fringe of a region.

"How we grow"- Sprawl as development oriented towards drivers as opposed to nondrivers.

Michael Lewyn
Blog post
March 31, 2008, 7pm PDT

Some transportation writers seem to believe that the interests of drivers and those of nondrivers are irreconcilable. For example, I just searched on google.com for websites using the terms “traffic calming” and “anti-automobile” together, and found over 60 such sites. But in fact, the interest of pedestrians in calmer, more walkable streets sometimes intersects (pun intended) with the interests of at least some motorists.

Michael Lewyn
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