Smart Growth

November 5, 2012, 11am PST
On the eve of the election, with scant mention of his position on issues such as transportation, smart growth, climate change, or even housing while on the campaign trail, Emily Badger tries to divine Mitt Romney's approach to urban issues.
The Atlantic Cities
Blog post
October 15, 2012, 8am PDT

Years ago, when I was researching my thesis concerning city planning thought in the 1940s and 50s, I came across an article from an American planning journal, which stated that "everyone is in favor of fast and efficient freeways" – the epitome of prevailing orthodoxy in an era of Interstate Highway construction. Now, when I share this quote with students, it only elicits derisive laughter.

Michael Dudley
October 5, 2012, 7am PDT
In the triple bottom line of profits, planet, and people, it's people that tend to get the shaft. Scott Doyon lays out seven ways to change that.
PlaceShakers
September 19, 2012, 9am PDT
A new study shows that denser, more transit-oriented development will lead to an overall decrease in miles driven, reports Angie Schmitt.
Streetsblog
September 7, 2012, 9am PDT
Blogging on HuffPo, Greg LeRoy, director of Good Jobs First, makes the case that transit, transit oriented development and smart growth are key factors in job growth.
Huffington Post
September 5, 2012, 5am PDT
DC Planning Director Harriet Tregoning discusses plans to create a pedestrian-oriented space out of the 11th Street Bridge as part of a larger goal of uniting DC around the Anacostia River, making it an amenity and not a barrier.
The Planning Report
September 2, 2012, 9am PDT
While it might seem like the Agenda 21 conspiracy theorists have arisen quite quickly out of the murky backwaters of the Republican party, Llewellyn Hinkes-Jones traces the lengthy enti-environmentalist roots of the movement.
The Atlantic Cities
August 6, 2012, 5am PDT
In producing updated sewer service maps, New Jersey's 21 counties have partnered to sketch out statewide development well into the future. Critics complain that the plans favor developers over the environment, reports Jill P. Capuzzo.
The New York Times
Blog post
July 26, 2012, 11am PDT

A recent paper by Harvard economists Daniel Shoag and Peter Ganong titled, Why Has Regional Convergence in the U.S. Stopped? indicates that land development regulations tend to increase housing costs, which contributes to inequality by excluding lower-income households from more economically productive urban regions. Does this means that planners are guilty of increasing income inequality?

Todd Litman
July 20, 2012, 6am PDT
As the U.S. experiences its worst drought in over half a century, Kaid Benfield questions the connection with the country's suburban growth patterns over that same period.
Switchboard
Feature
July 16, 2012, 5pm PDT

Since at least Le Corbusier’s Plan Voisin and the development of La Defense business district and the Tour Montparnasse, Paris has been subjected to the modernist redevelopment ideal of hig

Charles Siegel
July 10, 2012, 5am PDT
A new bill proposing major cuts to the EPA could rob cities across the country of a specialized set of programs created to boost economic well-being.
Next American City
Blog post
June 27, 2012, 3pm PDT
I appreciate natural environments. I have always enjoyed walking in wilderness and cycling on rural roads, and I understand the ecological value provided by undeveloped lands, which include clean water, air and wildlife habitat. I also enjoy local fresh vegetables and fruits and so appreciate the value of preserving regional farmlands. Planners call these "greenspace," or more generally "openspace" since some, such as deserts and waterways, are open but not necessarily green.
Todd Litman
June 4, 2012, 6am PDT
According to James A. Bacon, "Smart growth is too important to leave to liberals." In a new essay, he argues that "Conservatives must articulate their own vision for creating prosperous, livable and fiscally sustainable communities."
Bacon's Rebellion
Blog post
June 3, 2012, 8pm PDT

Congratulations to this year's high school, college and university graduates! The current crop includes our son, who was recruited by a major corporation. The location of his new job will affect his travel patterns and therefore the transportation costs he bears and imposes for the next few years: until now he could get around fine by walking, cycling and public transport, but his new worksite is outside the city center, difficult to access except by automobile. As a result he will spend a significant portion of his new income to purchase and operate a car, and contribute to traffic congestion, parking costs and pollution. This is an example of how land use decisions, such as where corporations locate their offices, affects regional transport patterns and costs.

Todd Litman
May 25, 2012, 7am PDT
An important new study published by the Arizona Department of Transportation indicates that, contrary to claims by critics, urban corridors have considerably less congestion than suburban corridors, despite many times higher densities.
Streetsblog D.C.
May 2, 2012, 11am PDT
Robert Steuteville looks at a recent report on the Golden State's supply and demand imbalance in the housing market. It's not what the <em>The Wall Street Journal</em> has led you to believe.
Better Cities & Towns
April 24, 2012, 12pm PDT
After a decade in ascendance, smart growth is showing its age. As its agenda becomes "formulaic and even clinical," Kaid Benfield argues for the need to reinvigorate, or move beyond, smart growth with more attention paid to the quality of a place.
Switchboard
April 23, 2012, 12pm PDT
<em>The Wall Street Journal's</em> obsession with planning in California continued this past weekend, as they asked Joel Kotkin, demographer and "Truman Democrat", to discuss what he believes is driving "the great California exodus".
The Wall Street Journal
April 23, 2012, 11am PDT
Lisa Hymas has a fascinating look at the anti-sprawl effort championed by Mitt Romney during his time as Governor of Massachusetts, which became the model for a key Obama “smart growth” initiative — the Partnership for Sustainable Communities.
Grist