2010 Census

Spatial analysis of income and education over time in U.S cities provides further evidence for the “New Donut” theory of the city. Wealthier and more educated residents are more likely to move to the urban core or exurbs than to inner-ring suburbs.
Oct 7, 2014   University of Virginia Center for Public Service
Would you believe its Olive Branch, Mississippi? Since 1990, the Memphis suburb has grown an astonishing 838 percent.
Apr 29, 2011   The Commercial Appeal
Detroit's population plunged by 25% over the last decade, according to census figures - the largest decline of any major city in American history.
Mar 23, 2011   New York Times
Census data shows that Lacrosse, WA (pop. 315) and other small, rural towns are getting smaller. Some blame the Conservation Reserve Program. But Lacrosse and many others aren't going quietly - they're fighting to hang on.
Mar 17, 2011   The Spokesman-Review
Census data is already in for a couple of dozen states, and already blogs are starting to speculate about their lessons for American cities.  Some commentators look at the continued decline of Rust Belt cities like Chicago and St. Louis, and suggest that suburban sprawl continues (and will forever continue) unabated.  But reality is not quite so simple. Opinion
Mar 3, 2011   By Michael Lewyn
St. Louis is reeling from the news that it lost 29,000 residents, or 8%, of its population since 2000. Bi-annual population estimates had led many to believe the city had finally turned a corner. Meanwhile, exurban counties posted 30+ percent growth.
Feb 27, 2011   Streetsblog Network
Laurent Belsie takes a first look at some unexpected results from Tuesday's data release.
Dec 24, 2010   The Christian Science Monitor
A Brookings Study of census data finds that since 2000, the number of poor people in the suburbs jumped by 37.4% to 13 million and "the growth rate of suburban poverty is more than double that of cities."
Oct 11, 2010   Los Angeles Times
How many people live in California? The current count could be off by 1.5 million people, and a lot is riding on the results of the 2010 Census. Josh Stephens talks to planners and state leaders about the flaws in the Census and how they'll shape state policy. Exclusive
Apr 8, 2010  By Josh Stephens
Cincinnati's Tract 16 is the neighborhood deemed hardest to count in Ohio by census takers. As the Enquirer puts it, "high numbers of abandoned buildings, low literacy rates and urban poverty make it a people-counting quagmire."
Mar 5, 2010   Cincinnati Enquirer
Census takers in New York City will face the tough challenge of tracking down people living in often illegally-built and hard to find small rooms and apartments.
Feb 24, 2010   The New York Times