U.S. Census Bureau

December 13, 2012, 12pm PST
Within three decades, there will no longer be a majority racial or ethnic group in the Unites States according to new Census Bureau projections released this week. Among the other findings: the country is growing slower than expected.
The New York Times
October 15, 2012, 12pm PDT
If you were confused by recent census data that named four California metros, including Delano (pop 53,819), as the most dense in America, a new report that looks at "population-weighted density" may deliver more satisfying results.
The Atlantic Cities
October 2, 2012, 6am PDT
Wendell Cox delves into the latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau that have prompted some to herald a return to America's downtowns, and argues that reports of such population growth are vastly overblown.
New Geography
September 28, 2012, 1pm PDT
Nate Berg looks at new data released by the U.S. Census Bureau that puts hard numbers behind what people across the country have observed: America's downtowns are booming again.
The Atlantic Cities
September 16, 2012, 11am PDT
New census data released last week made national headlines for its grim news on America's historically high levels of poverty. However, a new paper reads between the lines, and concludes that the country is making progress in reducing poverty.
The Atlantic Cities
July 19, 2012, 8am PDT
Urbanists got excited when new population data from the U.S. Census Bureau suggested bigger growth in cities compared to their suburbs. Eric Jaffe interviews Columbia professor David King on why this isn't necessarily true.
The Atlantic Cities
March 30, 2011, 9am PDT
As cities like Detroit show major population losses in the enumeration of the 2010 Census, experts discuss why cities are shrinking on this episode of the <em>Diane Rehm Show</em>.
The Diane Rehm Show
January 6, 2011, 8am PST
The U.S. Census Bureau has released a new set of formulae that dramatically change the way poverty is determined in the U.S., leaving behind the one-size-fits-all approach in use since the 1960s.
The Washington Post
December 21, 2010, 12pm PST
NPR reports how it will affect the electoral college, noting those that will gain House seats (south and west; mostly red) and the losers (north and mid-west; LA the exception; mostly blue). The Times reports on the importance of minorities.
National Public Radio
December 27, 2009, 9am PST
The economy has slowed growth to a trickle in states like Florida and Nevada, which had seen continuous growth for years.
USA Today
Blog post
July 20, 2009, 7pm PDT

One of the interesting parts of my position at the Boston Metropolitan Area Planning Council over the past year has been working with U.S. Census Bureau surveys and data. Since last September, this work has included preparations to ensure the region is prepared for the 2010 Census.

Mandated by the U.S. Constitution to determine political representation, every planner knows the U.S. Census has become the single most important data source for studying American cities. The U.S. Census Bureau produces dozens of surveys, the Census held once every ten years is by far the most important. Many of the other surveys, as well as countless private sector studies and projections, depend on the decennial census numbers.

Robert Goodspeed
July 1, 2009, 6am PDT
The U.S. Census Bureau recently released a list of the fastest-growing cities, in terms of population growth. Those on the list are hoping their growth will pull them through the recession.
The Christian Science Monitor
April 27, 2009, 7am PDT
Fewer Americans moved over the past year than any other year since 1962, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
The New York Times
March 24, 2009, 2pm PDT
Increased ethnic and language diversity, combined with widespread housing abandonment will make data gathering for the 2010 Census especially challenging.
CBS News
March 29, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>Sixteen percent of all American moving between July 2006 and July 2007 headed to Texas according to Census data released March 27. Four Texas regions were among the top ten destinations, mostly in the South and West.</p>
Associated Press via San Francisco Chronicle
March 27, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>Technological issues with the handheld computers to be used in the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census have frustrated officials and have them considering a plan to return to the traditional paper and pencil counting method of years past.</p>