Proof from the Census Bureau's latest American Community Survey on commuting by auto shows that millennials, if they live in cities, do indeed drive less. Census researcher Brian McKenzie describes the finding in the bureau's blog, Random Samplings.
Aug 18, 2015   Random Samplings
Race and ethnic groups have seen major shifts from the 1990s to today, according to this report from the Brookings Institution.
May 16, 2011   Brookings Institution
Family makeup is changing in New York City, where unmarried partners are on the rise and households with children are on the decline.
May 15, 2011   The New York Times
New York City has created its own version of the census to track transportation in the city, a job it says the federal government's counting system does poorly.
May 4, 2011   The New York Times
Why did the Census estimate Atlanta's population as 541,000 in 2009 and count only 420,000 people in 2010?
Apr 28, 2011   Atlanta Journal-Constitution
With millions of dollars in federal funding on the line, Brooklyn officials are calling foul on new Census numbers that set the population at 8.175 million people rather than the 8.4 million that locals supposed.
Apr 7, 2011   WNYC
Detroit's population plunged by 25% over the last decade, according to census figures - the largest decline of any major city in American history.
Mar 23, 2011   New York Times
New Census numbers show that Ohio is now less than 4% of the total U.S. population, which hasn't been the case since the Census of 1810.
Dec 27, 2010   The Columbus Dispatch
While integration of African-Americans is improving, while Hispanics are still are increasingly living in their own neighborhoods according to new Census data.
Dec 20, 2010   The Monterey County Herald
New data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that new immigrants have been heading to small towns and suburban areas rather than big cities over the past decade.
Dec 15, 2010   The New York Times
According to data from the most recent Census, segregation along racial lines has hit an 100-year low in seventy-five percent of U.S. metropolitan areas. Southern and Western cities have showed the most noticeable integration trends.
Dec 15, 2010   The Christian Science Monitor