Places

October 31, 2013, 9am PDT
Haunted houses are benign. If you want real evil, suggests Keith Eggener, look to the sentient houses in fiction and film that are "born bad". From Poe to Siddons, he explores examples of "architecture gone terribly wrong".
Places
October 27, 2012, 1pm PDT
Using Baltimore's Memorial Stadium, which was demolished in 2001, as a case study, Keith Eggener argues that the life of a building isn't confined to its physical presence as a whole object.
Places
June 2, 2012, 7am PDT
Public libraries across America are threatened by reduced staffing, resources, and hours due to budget cuts. However, "little libraries" are popping up in communities across the country as urbanists seek to redefine public space and librarianship.
Places
May 19, 2012, 1pm PDT
Following up on his insightful essay on the politics of architectural reputation seen through the career of Louis Curtiss, Keith Eggener examines the architect's innovations with glass curtain walls.
Places
April 22, 2012, 7am PDT
In April 1992, L.A. erupted in a torrent of burning, looting, and rioting following the acquittal of three police officers charged in the beating of Rodney King. Josh Sides looks at how the city responded to those events and how it's changed since.
Places
March 22, 2012, 9am PDT
Gabrielle Esperdy tags along on the travels of Reyner Banham, the British historian and critic of modern architecture and design, connecting them to the great historical travel accounts of Europeans abroad in America.
Places
March 7, 2012, 1pm PST
Giovanna Borasi & Mirko Zardini examine the state of pervasive anxiety afflicting the urban populations of the West and how "medicalization" and an ambition for total well-being are effecting architecture and urban planning.
Places
February 18, 2012, 11am PST
Jonathan Massey pens an essay in the journal <em>Places</em>, in which he probes the implications of homeownership as the vehicle by which the microeconomics of household finance and the macroeconomics of a globalized economy are mediated.
Places
February 12, 2012, 7am PST
In a fascinating essay in the journal <em>Places</em>, Keith Eggener examines the politics of architectural reputation through the lens of architect Louis Curtiss's life and career.
Places
January 29, 2012, 9am PST
In a long read published in <em>Places</em>, Austin Troy delves into the complicated nexus between the need to increase water resources and decrease energy use, which are both exacerbated by, and exacerbate, climate change.
Places
October 3, 2011, 8am PDT
Laura Tepper explains "road ecology", the intersection between transportation planning and habitat conservation.
Places
September 30, 2011, 12pm PDT
Architect Alan Chang writes an extensive piece for PLACES on the need to rethink how suburbs are built and designed now, before the economy recovers.
Places
September 6, 2011, 10am PDT
While the South is king when it comes to exurbs (low density, with workers who mostly commute to an urban area), the exurban experience has many faces, including small town New England.
Places
July 30, 2011, 9am PDT
This essay from <em>Places</em> looks at the history of "architectural fiction", and how imagined spaces and uses of land enrich understanding of the built environment.
Places
July 19, 2011, 9am PDT
California's San Joaquin Valley has become a hotbed of foreclosed homes. But beyond mere statistics, these homes are real places, and a new series of photographs documents them as scenes of surrender and abandonment.
Places
June 28, 2011, 6am PDT
In this piece from <em>Places</em>, Deborah Gans offers a firsthand look at planning for recovery in the city's neglected East side.
Places
June 2, 2011, 8am PDT
This piece from <em>Places</em> delves into the history of the campsite, their use of space, and their role in modern culture.
Places
May 25, 2011, 10am PDT
In this excerpt from a new book on Los Angeles, L.A.-based architect Michael Maltzan reflects on the city, and how its clashes and evolving identity are part of why it represents the future of cities.
Places
May 6, 2011, 7am PDT
In comparing the legacies of artist Andy Warhol and urban thinker Jane Jacobs, this essay suggests that the sort of urban community we think of today is more a result of Warhol.
Places
April 27, 2011, 2pm PDT
Is urban planning losing its relevance as a profession? Some say yes. In this essay from <em>Places</em>, Thomas Campanella suggests that the roots of this fall from grace lie in the era of Jane Jacobs.
Places