Levees

In California, some worry that the state's aging delta levees are in extreme danger of being destroyed by earthquakes. And as environmental concerns rise, the state is considering plans to re-engineer its water supplies to prevent another "Katrina".
Jan 6, 2011   Miller-McCune
The Times-Picayune reports that the Army Corps of Engineers, under pressure from penny-pinched local governments, has commenced a new pilot study that potentially relaxes the new, stricter standards for levees it set in place post-Katrina.
Oct 19, 2010   The Times-Picayune
The waters that have for so long plagued New Orleans should be reconsidered as an amenity, not a curse, according to this commentary.
Sep 3, 2010   Bloomberg
Using five examples, this piece from <em>The New York Times</em> looks at how small problems can lead to huge issues in America's aging infrastructure.
Aug 30, 2010   The New York Times
Three design firms offer new ideas for redesigning New Orleans' levees.
Aug 5, 2010   Good
Breached levees are a major concern for riverside cities; New Orleans struggled with their disastrous results after Hurricane Katrina. While shoring and sandbagging have been relied upon in the past, new methods for stopping breaches are emerging.
Dec 31, 2009   The Economist
By 2100, vast stretches of the Mississippi Delta will be lost to sea level rise, according to a recent study. More than 5,000 square miles could be lost, including much of New Orleans, researchers say.
Jul 6, 2009   The Christian Science Monitor
This article from <em>Wired</em> looks at new plans to prevent massive flooding in the low-lying Netherlands.
Jan 3, 2009   Wired
New Orleans homeowners have begun receiving letters from the Army Corps of Engineers demanding that they remove objects that obstruct nearby levees' rights of way, including fences and trees. If history repeats itself, this may get messy.
Oct 16, 2008   The Times-Picayune
<p>This article from <em>The Christian Science Monitor</em> looks at how development, farm practices, and population growth have increased the risk of flooding.</p>
Jun 19, 2008   The Christian Science Monitor
<p>Flood waters along the Mississippi River continue to rise, leaving many Midwest towns deep under water. The Army Corps of Engineers has just identified 27 levees that may not be high enough to handle the rising waters.</p>
Jun 18, 2008   USA Today