Domestic Migration

5 days ago
Apartment List has published research showing the top destination cities for those 19 to 35 years of age based on ten years of census data from 2005-2010. Among the top 10 destinations, only three were on East and West coasts.
Apartment List
June 1, 2016, 8am PDT
An op-ed in the New York Times makes a cogent case for increasing movement between states for self-betterment, specifically from high unemployment states to states like New Hampshire and North Dakota, and what policy changes would encourage it.
The New York Times
May 22, 2016, 11am PDT
Officials and residents in Washington, D.C. are often heard saying that the District is gaining 1,000 new residents every month. But what does it mean?
Greater Greater Washington
April 19, 2016, 7am PDT
A post in reply to the question: If so many people are leaving New York and Los Angeles, why are they still growing?
StatChat
December 29, 2015, 9am PST
New Census data provides a contemporary view of domestic migration, which has returned to pre-recession patterns.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
September 1, 2015, 7am PDT
According to analysts like Aaron Renn, the exodus of educated Millennials from what some perceive to be less-glamorous cities shouldn't signal impending doom. For one thing, brain drain might not be happening at all.
Next City
April 28, 2015, 9am PDT
Census Bureau data indicates that the shift to Sun Belt suburbs is still the majority preference. Turns out warmth, jobs, and affordable housing are a powerful triumvirate.
The New York Times
March 30, 2015, 11am PDT
During the year 2014, a record number of people chose to make their home in King County, Washington. And 2015 may shape up to shatter last year's record.
The Seattle Times
January 23, 2015, 9am PST
For a variety of economic reasons in addition to urban preferences, young people are not leaving the country's three major metropolitan areas: New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago, and that's not good for the nation's economy nor the individuals.
The Wall Street Journal
January 7, 2015, 11am PST
Same story, different year, though more data provided on which groups are leaving the Golden State: predominantly workers earning less than $50,000 a year. Conversely, those migrating to California from other states had higher incomes and education.
Los Angeles Times
January 4, 2015, 9am PST
William H. Frey, Brookings Institution demographer, writes on the latest Census Bureau demographic data. California and Texas remain number one and two respectively. New York had 19.7 million residents on July 1, 2014, Florida 19.9 million people.
Brookings
August 15, 2014, 8am PDT
The New York Times recently visualized domestic migration and population makeup for each state in the United States from 1900 until today using Census data.
The New York Times
August 4, 2014, 9am PDT
Although Americans are moving less, many of those that have migrated recently have decamped to inland cities where they can afford the cost of housing, according to an article by Shaila Dewan.
New York Times
April 22, 2014, 5am PDT
A new post by Richard Florida distinguished between the two different types of migration—domestic and international—driving the influx of residents in urban centers around the country.
Atlantic Cities
April 14, 2014, 12pm PDT
After a decade of incredible growth, a tightening job market has finally slowed the domestic migration into Washington D.C.
Washington Post
April 5, 2013, 6am PDT
In this op-ed, Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore analyze the recent Census findings showing renewed migration from the Northeast and Midwest to the South and Southwest. They note the movement is clearly from blue states to red, and explain why.
The Wall Street Journal
March 14, 2013, 1pm PDT
New Census data shows that after a recession induced respite, "Americans have resumed moving from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South," reports Neil Shah. Four of the nation's fastest growing large metro areas are located in Texas.
The Wall Street Journal
May 20, 2012, 9am PDT
Is it a calamity that more Californians are leaving the state than are migrating there from others? USC demographer Dowell Myers takes a closer look at migration data and finds that most native-born Californians remain there.
Zocalo Public Square
July 2, 2011, 5am PDT
African Americans in the North are reversing the trend set by their parents and grandparents by migrating back to the South. This post from <em>Grist</em> looks at the impact on communities and urbanism.
Grist
May 16, 2011, 10am PDT
Race and ethnic groups have seen major shifts from the 1990s to today, according to this report from the Brookings Institution.
Brookings Institution