Domestic Migration

A new post by Richard Florida distinguished between the two different types of migration—domestic and international—driving the influx of residents in urban centers around the country.
Apr 22, 2014   Atlantic Cities
After a decade of incredible growth, a tightening job market has finally slowed the domestic migration into Washington D.C.
Apr 14, 2014   Washington Post
In this op-ed, Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore analyze the recent Census findings showing renewed migration from the Northeast and Midwest to the South and Southwest. They note the movement is clearly from blue states to red, and explain why.
Apr 5, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
New Census data shows that after a recession induced respite, "Americans have resumed moving from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South," reports Neil Shah. Four of the nation's fastest growing large metro areas are located in Texas.
Mar 14, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
Is it a calamity that more Californians are leaving the state than are migrating there from others? USC demographer Dowell Myers takes a closer look at migration data and finds that most native-born Californians remain there.
May 20, 2012   Zocalo Public Square
African Americans in the North are reversing the trend set by their parents and grandparents by migrating back to the South. This post from <em>Grist</em> looks at the impact on communities and urbanism.
Jul 2, 2011   Grist
Race and ethnic groups have seen major shifts from the 1990s to today, according to this report from the Brookings Institution.
May 16, 2011   Brookings Institution
This interactive map from <em>Forbes</em> shows, county by county, where Americans moved in 2008.
Apr 9, 2011   Forbes
Cities with high populations of black Americans are losing them, according to figures form the U.S. Census Bureau.
Mar 24, 2011   USA Today
After decades of being a nation of rural dwellers, Indians are rapidly moving into cities in search of better jobs, but the housing infrastructure is not keeping pace.
Dec 5, 2010   The New York Times
On his blog, Aaron Renn has done an analysis of 2008 tax return data from metropolitan areas to show where domestic migration is happening. Some of his findings are a bit surprising.
Nov 17, 2010   The Urbanophile