Domestic Migration

During the year 2014, a record number of people chose to make their home in King County, Washington. And 2015 may shape up to shatter last year's record.
2 days ago   The Seattle Times
For a variety of economic reasons in addition to urban preferences, young people are not leaving the country's three major metropolitan areas: New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago, and that's not good for the nation's economy nor the individuals.
Jan 23, 2015   The Wall Street Journal
Same story, different year, though more data provided on which groups are leaving the Golden State: predominantly workers earning less than $50,000 a year. Conversely, those migrating to California from other states had higher incomes and education.
Jan 7, 2015   Los Angeles Times
William H. Frey, Brookings Institution demographer, writes on the latest Census Bureau demographic data. California and Texas remain number one and two respectively. New York had 19.7 million residents on July 1, 2014, Florida 19.9 million people.
Jan 4, 2015   Brookings
The New York Times recently visualized domestic migration and population makeup for each state in the United States from 1900 until today using Census data.
Aug 15, 2014   The New York Times
Although Americans are moving less, many of those that have migrated recently have decamped to inland cities where they can afford the cost of housing, according to an article by Shaila Dewan.
Aug 4, 2014   New York Times
A new post by Richard Florida distinguished between the two different types of migration—domestic and international—driving the influx of residents in urban centers around the country.
Apr 22, 2014   Atlantic Cities
After a decade of incredible growth, a tightening job market has finally slowed the domestic migration into Washington D.C.
Apr 14, 2014   Washington Post
In this op-ed, Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore analyze the recent Census findings showing renewed migration from the Northeast and Midwest to the South and Southwest. They note the movement is clearly from blue states to red, and explain why.
Apr 5, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
New Census data shows that after a recession induced respite, "Americans have resumed moving from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South," reports Neil Shah. Four of the nation's fastest growing large metro areas are located in Texas.
Mar 14, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
Is it a calamity that more Californians are leaving the state than are migrating there from others? USC demographer Dowell Myers takes a closer look at migration data and finds that most native-born Californians remain there.
May 20, 2012   Zocalo Public Square