Traffic

December 11, 2015, 5am PST
Not recommended reading for those currently operating a motor vehicle.
Medium
December 5, 2015, 1pm PST
Mexico City is considering a novel transit idea: two-person gondolas gliding along an aerial track. The costs of such a system may be far lower than extending the subway system.
Quartz
November 12, 2015, 12pm PST
Pope Francis' much-publicized visit to the capital in late September saw reductions in congestion and better travel times. Event-specific telecommuting policies and transit route changes appear responsible for the minor miracle.
The Washington Post
November 12, 2015, 5am PST
With a growing reputation for heavy local pollution, the city of Madrid will impose reduced speed limits and driving restrictions in its central core. On bad days, transit will be free to ride.
CityLab
Blog post
October 13, 2015, 6am PDT
The phrase "traffic congestion" can be misleading; some reductions in traffic speed are less harmful than others.
Michael Lewyn
September 29, 2015, 2pm PDT
Thinking about congestion as an economic problem generates new solutions for the problem as well as a response to accusations of social engineering.
Urban Kchoze
September 10, 2015, 11am PDT
A team of designers will convert one Mexico City's most dangerous highways into an urban oasis.
ASLA's The Dirt blog
September 10, 2015, 9am PDT
As the city of Houston is growing, car traffic and rail traffic are also growing. The conflict between the two will be very expensive to resolve.
The Houston Chronicle
Blog post
September 2, 2015, 10am PDT
Tired of standing on a street corner to count traffic? Technology is automating traffic counts and providing more detailed and accurate data to support planning.
Jennifer Evans-Cowley
August 23, 2015, 5am PDT
At some point, in places all over the country, freeways stopped working as they were intended. What can be done to improve one of the great frustrations of life with a car?
Pacific Standard
August 19, 2015, 9am PDT
It is difficult to imagine a time when Los Angeles' freeways symbolized access, efficiency, and modernity. Now that the city's love affair with freeways is nearly spent, what future do we envision for them?
Los Angeles Times
Blog post
August 5, 2015, 2pm PDT
Attempts to limit new construction to preserve neighborhood character are an example of "beggar thy neighbor" politics.
Michael Lewyn
July 11, 2015, 7am PDT
In the ongoing quest to better measure the use of streets by all modes—a new tool could be a game changer for transportation engineers, planners, and advocates alike.
Streetsblog USA
June 5, 2015, 7am PDT
After a $2.3 billion widening project, traffic once again chokes the Katy Freeway's 23 lanes. For road spending critics who are also taxpayers, this I-told-you-so moment is bittersweet.
Streetsblog Network
May 18, 2015, 12pm PDT
In February, the city council approved One Paseo, a 1.4 million-square-foot mix of offices, residences, retail, and entertainment. The project's detractors have forced a referendum, putting a kink in San Diego's urbanist planning ambitions.
ULI Urban Land Magazine
May 5, 2015, 2pm PDT
A partnership between Waze and the city of Los Angeles has prompted a cry of "not on the street in front of my frontyard!" from residential neighborhoods around the city.
Los Angeles Times
April 28, 2015, 6am PDT
For the Charlotte Observer, Ely Portillo reports on a forum calling for urbanist reforms and doubts whether auto-loving residents will be receptive.
The Charlotte Observer
March 15, 2015, 9am PDT
Few of us are fully immune from the effects of road rage. Psychologists are asking why driving can provoke changes in behavior—and how to avert them.
Pacific Standard
February 18, 2015, 11am PST
A local blogger takes umbrage with claims that Austin's density is causing its traffic problems. The obvious problem with that argument: Austin is 68% as dense now as it was in 1950.
Car Free Austin
February 5, 2015, 9am PST
Even as innovations like ridesharing take hold in tech-friendly San Francisco, the percentage of trips taken by personal auto is stuck at just under 50 percent.
Streetsblog SF