Blog post
June 18, 2014, 2pm PDT
Development and research projects allow small firms entry into large-scale design.
Anna Bergren Miller
May 11, 2014, 11am PDT
Researcher Chris Ives suggests that rather than relying solely on economic gains to justify urban nature and biodiversity, community values may be more effective in gaining public support.
Sustainable Cities Collective
February 5, 2013, 4pm PST
Urban planning professionals and researchers increasingly face information overload. Todd BenDor and Rob Goodspeed suggest three techniques for strategically monitoring the web for new research and ideas.
Todd BenDor
December 26, 2012, 5am PST
Comparing wide versus narrow lanes, Kenneth A. Small and Chen Feng Ng examine the relatively unexplored design of building more compact roads to alleviate traffic congestion.
June 28, 2012, 6am PDT
As new research data on cities pours in daily, interesting patterns emerge regarding income, green space and urban growth. Like people in their genetic make-up, are cities fundamentally all the same?
The Economist
Blog post
May 11, 2012, 9am PDT

People love statistics. They let us understanding the world beyond our own senses. USA Todaypublishes a daily Snapshotwhich presents a graph of random statistics. Sports talk and business analysis are dominated by statistics. We measure our progress, or lack thereof, and compare ourselves with others, based on statistics about our size, activities and accomplishments.

Todd Litman
April 13, 2012, 10am PDT
In the second part of a four part series on America's pedestrian problem, Tom Vanderbilt evaluates the surprisingly formalized field of pedestrian behavior research, from navigating crowded sidewalks to tripping at the bottom of the stairs.
March 23, 2012, 5am PDT
Eric Jaffe examines research on just what it is that makes people walk faster in New York than, say, Fargo, North Dakota.
The Atlantic Cities
July 14, 2011, 10am PDT
In the Brookings Institute's pulse check on the nation's clean economy, researchers found that most of the country's clean economy jobs and recent growth were held in the largest metropolitan areas.
The Brookings Institute
March 16, 2011, 1pm PDT
Who's the happiest and healthiest of them all? The New York Times posts an interactive map of the national Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.
New York Times
March 1, 2011, 2pm PST
Will digital communications make cities obsolete, or can online connections actually complement the face-to-face interactions and the cities that support them?
New York Times
Blog post
January 5, 2011, 8am PST

In coming weeks doctoral applications in planning are due. Why apply?

For professional planners, a PhD sometimes sounds interesting compared with doing a regular job in a municipality. Some designers remember studio professors who seemed to float into class, unprepared, for a few hours per week. Compared with the ups and downs of private design practice, this can seem quite appealing. Of course, some people genuinely like studying and research, want to make a contribution in that area, and have a flair for teaching.

Ann Forsyth
November 1, 2010, 10am PDT
In a field such as planning that is rich with quantifiable data, why there so little focus on evidence rather than opinion?, wonders researcher Martin Laplante.
Martin Laplante
October 2, 2010, 5am PDT
Perceptions about the amount of time transit trips take have been found to fall significantly when people actually take transit, according to a new report.
September 14, 2010, 10am PDT
New report details park spending, facilities, use, and trends
2010 City Park Facts
July 5, 2010, 7am PDT
The UC Berkeley Institute of Transportation Studies has issued a report questioning ridership projections on the $43+ billion, 800 mile, voter-approved California High Speed Rail project. Cambridge Systematics defends their numbers.
San Francisco Chronicle
February 9, 2010, 7am PST
A new study ranks the U.S. states by residents' happiness. From Louisiana (#1) to New York (#51), the happiest people tend to live in sunny, outdoorsy states with strong quality of life measures.
USA Today
Blog post
December 20, 2008, 7pm PST

Terrorized by the literature is the title of a chapter of Howard Becker’s excellent book, Writing for Social Scientists (1986, Chicago). Whether through terror or misunderstanding, the literature review is one of the areas that students in planning find most confusing. While I have dealt with the literature review briefly in my blog on writing proposals, the tips below provide more detailed advice on how to compose a literature review and how to find important literature in the age of information overload. 

Ann Forsyth
November 27, 2008, 9am PST
The controversial theory that social and physical disorder is a cause of neighborhood crime has been successfully demonstrated with a series of six experiments.
The Economist
Blog post
February 29, 2008, 12pm PST

In January I explored what kind of exit paper or project students of planning should prepare, why they should write such papers, and when. This month I turn to the proposal, examining key issues any proposal writer needs to consider. As I outline below, the parts of the proposal are fairly standard. However, three areas typically trip up students working on exit projects: identifying the audience(s), framing the question, and reviewing the literature.

Ann Forsyth