Research

The Urban Land Institute just rolled out How Housing Matters, an online portal for news, research, infographics, and multimedia examining how housing affects community health.
Mar 2, 2015   Architect Magazine
Researchers at MIT have developed a new, flexible congestion pricing system.
Sep 25, 2014   Wired
While the neighborhoods on northern segments of the Atlanta's BeltLine has received 94 percent of funding invested towards parks and trails, segments to the south have received 86 percent of affordable housing investments.
Sep 25, 2014   SaportaReport
Blog Post
For small architecture firms, transitioning from designing buildings to designing urban spaces is easier said than done. Without a commission for a large-scale project, they have two options. They can wait, and carry on with small residential and commercial projects. Blog Post
Jun 18, 2014   By Anna Bergren Miller
Researcher Chris Ives suggests that rather than relying solely on economic gains to justify urban nature and biodiversity, community values may be more effective in gaining public support.
May 11, 2014   Sustainable Cities Collective
Exclusive
Urban planning professionals and researchers increasingly face information overload. Todd BenDor and Rob Goodspeed suggest three techniques for strategically monitoring the web for new research and ideas. Exclusive
Feb 5, 2013  By Todd BenDor
Comparing wide versus narrow lanes, Kenneth A. Small and Chen Feng Ng examine the relatively unexplored design of building more compact roads to alleviate traffic congestion.
Dec 26, 2012   Access
As new research data on cities pours in daily, interesting patterns emerge regarding income, green space and urban growth. Like people in their genetic make-up, are cities fundamentally all the same?
Jun 28, 2012   The Economist
People love statistics. They let us understanding the world beyond our own senses. USA Today publishes a daily Snapshot which presents a graph of random statistics. Sports talk and business analysis Blog Post
May 11, 2012   By Todd Litman
In the second part of a four part series on America's pedestrian problem, Tom Vanderbilt evaluates the surprisingly formalized field of pedestrian behavior research, from navigating crowded sidewalks to tripping at the bottom of the stairs.
Apr 13, 2012   Slate
Eric Jaffe examines research on just what it is that makes people walk faster in New York than, say, Fargo, North Dakota.
Mar 23, 2012   The Atlantic Cities