Christopher Leinberger

July 10, 2015, 2pm PDT
A wealthy county in Virginia has a reputation for prohibiting the construction of new housing. Development interests, however, are fed up with anti-development arguments.
The Washington Post
November 3, 2014, 2pm PST
"Mini D.C.s" provide the successful examples of revitalized, walkable urban places, according to a recent trend piece in the Washington Post.
The Washington Post
October 3, 2013, 5am PDT
A new study indicates that one of America's poster children for auto-centric development has a made a significant u-turn. Since 2009, the majority of Atlanta's new commercial and rental housing has been built in "walkable urban places".
The Atlantic Cities
May 2, 2013, 10am PDT
Patrick J. Kiger looks at the global trends that will impact urban landscapes over the next 50 years and explores two competing visions for the future of land use.
Urban Land
September 22, 2012, 7am PDT
As if to show that "walkable" is the new mobility in America, even with single-family-homes, new census findings show two-thirds of homes constructed last year had front porches while the number of garages or carports decreased to late 1990 levels.
USA Today
February 29, 2012, 6am PST
Is the dream home for the New Era compact, connected and mortgage free?
PlaceShakers
December 12, 2011, 6am PST
The Times published three responses to op-eds by Leinberger and anti-sprawl contributor, Louise A. Mozingo. Univ. of IL urban planning professor and author Robert Bruegmann and Carnegie Endowment director Shin-Pei Tsay present contrasting viewpoints.
The New York Times - Letters To Editor
November 27, 2011, 9am PST
Christopher B. Leinberger expounds on the mortgage crisis plaguing America, particularly the exurbs. Rather than being a product of the excesses of bank lending and regulation, Leinberger attributes it to demographic changes benefiting cities.
The New York Times- Opinion Pages
July 13, 2010, 2pm PDT
Christopher Leinberger, author of The Option of Urbanism, takes on Joel Kotkin's latest dustup on the "war between the city and the suburbs." Leinberger argues that the data Kotkin's using is dated and doesn't reflect reality.
Brookings blog
March 21, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>The mortgage crisis is devastating many communities far from urban centers, while 'inner cities', regionally speaking, are weathering the financial storm far better thanks to their urban form that makes them attractive to those that can afford them.</p>
The San Francisco Chronicle