Pedestrians

January 26, 2010, 10am PST
The streets of Mumbai are packed with pedestrians. With few sidewalks and little room for the growing masses of walkers, city officials are looking to beat the pedestrian congestion by building overhead "skywalks" to bring people above the street.
The Wall Street Journal
January 22, 2010, 2pm PST
Casper, a cat from Plymouth, England who was frequently seen riding one of the town's bus lines, was tragically killed by a hit-and-run driver.
The Herald
December 6, 2009, 9am PST
The Unified Traffic and Transportation Infrastructure (Planning and Engineering) Centre (UTTIPEC) has for the first time created pedestrian design guidelines to ensure that walking in the city is a safe and a pleasurable experience.
Hindustan Times
November 17, 2009, 5am PST
An extension of one of L.A.'s light rail lines opened this past weekend. <em>Los Angeles Times</em> architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne offers a hopeful prediction that the extension will inspire an improvement in streetlife.
Los Angeles Times
November 15, 2009, 9am PST
Over the past 15 years, more than 76,000 pedestrians have been killed in the U.S. Some say preventing a significant portion of these deaths is as simple as enforcing jaywalking laws. Not so, argues Tom Vanderbilt, author of <em>Traffic</em>.
Slate
November 3, 2009, 6am PST
Residents in Vancouver are reportedly in favor of keeping a dedicated lane for pedestrians and cyclists on a local bridge. Even some motorists are in support.
The Vancouver Sun
Blog post
October 15, 2009, 10am PDT

A few days ago I posted a blog that discussed the concept of Universal Design (transportation facilities designed to accommodate all possible users, including those with disabilities and other special needs) and the value it provides to individuals and communities. One way to approach this issue is to define the design vehicle for pedestrian facilities.

Todd Litman
October 10, 2009, 11am PDT
This article from <em>Wired UK</em> looks at a handful of emerging transportation concept technologies that are altering the form of the city.
Wired UK
October 4, 2009, 7am PDT
A 15-year-old ban on biking and walking to school in Saratoga Springs, New York may be lifted, after one bike-friendly parent challenged the policy.
Governing
September 22, 2009, 5am PDT
New parks are popping up with a quickness in San Francisco, where planners have fast-tracked the conversion of street spaces into pedestrian parks.
The Architect's Newspaper
September 11, 2009, 7am PDT
San Francisco's notoriously congested Market Street will soon see a lighter load of traffic, as officials roll out a pilot project that will ban private vehicles from the roadway.
San Francisco Chronicle
August 20, 2009, 8am PDT
This oped takes on American street design and blames it for causing countless road injuries and deaths.
The Boston Globe
August 8, 2009, 7am PDT
A new light rail bridge spanning the Willamette River in Portland will include separate lanes for pedestrians and cyclists -- and no lanes for automobiles. But biker and pedestrian congestion remains a concern.
The Oregonian
June 30, 2009, 6am PDT
While New York City is currently taking space away from automobiles and giving it to pedestrians and cyclists, the New York City of 100 years ago was doing exactly the opposite. And it was a popular idea.
The New York Times
Blog post
June 17, 2009, 11am PDT

If you watched or read the news yesterday, then you likely came across the sentencing of Donte Stallworth. Previously known (maybe) for being an NFL role player, Stallworth will serve a 30 day sentence for hitting and killing a pedestrian named Mario Reyes while driving intoxicated here in Miami Beach. The typical sentence for such an offense in Florida is 4 to 15 years. Stallworth will be released just in time for his NFL training camp.

How convenient. 

Mike Lydon
May 29, 2009, 6am PDT
Alamo Heights, a suburb of San Antonio, grapples with whether to adopt a "New Urbanist" (but slightly more traditional) approach to its major thoroughfare to improve pedestrian and bicycle access.
San Antonio Express-News
Blog post
March 12, 2009, 10am PDT

If you’re working in the transportation industry, you know there are basically two ways to contribute to the amazing shift in perspective going on in our country towards livable streets: Advocacy or Consultancy.  On one hand, you can work with a non-profit organization or advocacy group to push the envelope and make a stir.  This is the perceived over-the-top approach because the norm is so far away from where things could really be.  For example, in a saner world, the Critical Mass bike rides that have long rubbed New York City Police the wrong way would not be necessary because thousands of bicyclists would already be respected and given appropriate space on city streets.  But someone has to scream “Wake Up!”  On the other hand, you can choose to work “from the inside

Ian Sacs
Blog post
February 17, 2009, 4pm PST
A week ago I spent some time with Enrique Peñalosa, urban strategist and provocateur. North Americans don’t often look south for innovation, but Peñalosa made remarkable changes in the public environment as Mayor of the city of Bogotá, Colombia. Nearly impeached for his actions to push cars aside in favor of people, now he is invited to provoke and inspire others.  “We have Environmental Impact Statements; why don’t we have Human Impact statements,” is a sampling from last week.
Barbara Knecht
December 17, 2008, 5am PST
<em>New York Magazine</em>'s list of reasons to love New York includes a nod to the city's streets and their recent renovation into pedestrian- and bike-friendly thoroughfares.
New York Magazine
December 15, 2008, 8am PST
This piece from <em>Worldchanging</em> looks at recent efforts by cities to "reconquer" streets by making them (temporarily, at least) pedestrianized and closed off to car traffic.
WorldChanging