Multi-modal

Feature
March 10, 2016, 2pm PST
Simply banning bikes from riding on sidewalks does more harm than good. A better understanding of why people choose to ride bikes on the sidewalk will be necessary to create safer environments for all users.
Ariel Godwin and Anne M. Price
October 16, 2015, 8am PDT
The Federal Highway Administration may put an end to rules mandating wide lanes and "clear zones," making it easier to implement complete streets.
Streetsblog USA
August 19, 2015, 9am PDT
It is difficult to imagine a time when Los Angeles' freeways symbolized access, efficiency, and modernity. Now that the city's love affair with freeways is nearly spent, what future do we envision for them?
Los Angeles Times
July 31, 2015, 12pm PDT
According to an audit, the Denver Moves plan hasn't lived up to its goals, mainly because of a poor showing in the city's budget since implementation in 2011.
The Denver Post
July 6, 2015, 9am PDT
It's no secret that Millennials will use alternate modes when they're available and accessible. It's also no secret that adapting streets to those modes—and using them—can be a bargain.
Governing
May 19, 2015, 1pm PDT
Train-bus-bike connector stations have a long pedigree, and a reputation for anchoring neighborhood investment. But some criticize planned hubs for their perceived lavishness.
Next City
December 31, 2014, 6am PST
82 percent of public transportation users last summer report having an automobile in their household.
American Public Transportation Association (APTA)
October 31, 2014, 1pm PDT
Dan Reed examines the Green Line in Minneapolis near the campus of the University of Minnesota as a case study of how transit can improve streets.
Greater Greater Washington
October 24, 2014, 6am PDT
A new study from Virginia Tech reclassifies what defines multi-modal commuters.
CityLab
Blog post
September 17, 2009, 9am PDT

Should society encourage parents to drive children to school rather than walk or bicycle? Should our transportation policies favor driving over walking, cycling, ridesharing, public transit and telecommuting? Probably not. There is no logical reason to favor automobile travel over other forms of accessibility, and there are lots of good reasons to favor efficient modes, so for example, schools spend at least as much to accommodate a walking or cycling trip as an automobile trip, and transportation agencies and employers spend at least as much to improve ridesharing and public transit commuting as automobile commuting.

Todd Litman