Land Use

September 3, 2009, 1pm PDT
Consumer preference surveys indicate that total U.S. demand for large-lot, exurban housing will not increase, while demand for small-lot and attached housing in accessible, multi-modal locations will double during the next two decades.
Victoria Transport Policy Institute
August 11, 2009, 9am PDT
The Portland, Oregon area is well known for preserving agricultural land separate from urban areas. In the new town of Damascus on the border of the growth boundary, landowners are seeking a way to mix the two.
The Oregonian
June 22, 2009, 12pm PDT
Texas Governor Rick Perry recently vetoed a bill that would have created a state level "smart growth" program.
New Geography
June 15, 2009, 8am PDT
As farmland prices skyrocketed, so did the cost of growing a suburb.
New Geography
June 7, 2009, 1pm PDT
Two representatives of a committee charged with implementing reductions in VMT to meet California's SB 375 goals discuss the challenges.
The Planning Report
May 16, 2009, 1pm PDT
San Francisco, Houston, and Indianapolis are featuring public art installations that mimic and highlight nature in urban areas.
Next American City
March 19, 2009, 9am PDT
Envisioning a form of government more efficient to strategically invest scarce local, state and federal dollars is at the heart of such a proposal.
Albany
Blog post
March 6, 2009, 11am PST

Having become something of a junkie who overdoses on political and economic news, it is only natural that I try to help justify that time investment by scouring the news for tidbits that have professional relevance.  Just this past week several things have come across my monitor that have made me reflect. 

Steven Polzin
August 11, 2008, 12pm PDT
Former Congressman Ernest Istook discusses why the automobile is the ultimate manifestation of freedom, mobility, and personal choice, and argues for a re-allocation of public spending away from mass transit and other alternatives.
WorldNetDaily
June 6, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>Following the example set by Sao Paulo, Brazil, the city of Encinitas, California is considering a plan to ban new billboard advertisements within the city.</p>
The North County Times
May 31, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>Waynesville, North Carolina Mayor Gavin Brown is forced to give up on pedestrian-friendly design to save potential jobs from Best Buy.</p>
The Smoky Mountain News
May 22, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>A campaign is underway in Wales to revive the "Garden City" concept, first brought to life in 1898. This time, supporters are claiming the radial, suburban plan is a sustainable alternative to cities.</p>
Western Mail, Wales
May 6, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>The agreement trades a massive open space donation and other terms for clearance to conduct exploratory drilling off the coast.</p>
The Planning Report
March 31, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>Officials in Los Angeles were successful in implementing high-density growth policies to curb sprawl. However, a disconnect between culture, transportation policy, and the real estate market may have disastrous consequences.</p>
The Economist
Blog post
March 26, 2008, 3pm PDT

We’ve been conducting public meetings for years. And it used to be easier. Present the plan. Discuss the plan. Talk about how your plan is better for the neighborhood/community/city/region and provide the conclusion. But things have changed.  

Barbara Faga
Blog post
November 26, 2007, 10am PST

One of the more powerful concepts to come out of the information and services economy is the Long Tail.

Samuel Staley
Blog post
November 15, 2007, 2pm PST

Transcontinental flights are a great time to catch up on reading, and a recent flight from San Jose to Chicago inspired this blog post. As I was reading book #1 (below), I realized that a number books have been published recently that have important things to say about cities although they might be dismissed too easily as reactionary, ideological, or simply not relevant to urban planning.

Samuel Staley
Blog post
September 25, 2007, 11am PDT

What if the utility company asked you how much you made when you called to start service in a new home?  What if they wanted this information to tie your bill to your salary and not to how much gas, electricity or water you used?  Would that seem fair?  That’s how some communities are treating developers when determining how much stormwater they should be required to manage.  But regulations that link stormwater standards to the developer’s ability to pay are neither fair nor efficient.  Environmental regulations and their costs should be directly linked to the impact on the environment, not to profit margins.

Blog post
July 21, 2007, 7pm PDT

I couldn’t wait to use the new word, ginormous, which Merriam-Webster recently added to the Collegiate Dictionary.  My spell checker has been trained and now I can get about the business of saving ginormous amounts of energy.  Recent bouts of ecoterrorism in the form of Hummer vandalism in Washington D.C. and the growing media attention to the environmental hypocrisy of the travel and housing habits of card-carrying carbon footprint club members (take a gander at the 10,000 sq. ft. home of Al Gore or the 28,200 sq.

Steven Polzin
Blog post
July 8, 2007, 4pm PDT

I find it intriguing when I hear folks talk about how high energy prices will cause a tipping point and everyone will rush back into the city in order to afford to commute to work.  If, or as, higher costs for energy begin to play a greater role in location choice it is as likely that they will force even more employers to move to the suburbs.  In many urban areas we may be well past the point where fuel price pressures to minimize travel would result in land use changes that move population back to town. 

Steven Polzin