Wastewater

According to the Center for Biological Diversity, toxic wastewater from oil industry fracking operations has been illegally injected into Central Valley disposal sites, posing a threat to water supplies of nearby residents.
Oct 9, 2014   DeSmogBlog.com
If you really want to know how prevalent drug use is in your community, don't ask people–just test their wastewater.
Jan 27, 2014   Environmental Health News
London's wastewater problems go at least as far back as the 19th century, before a 1,100-mile system of tunnels was built to divert the city's waste downstream. A plan to fix that system with a tunnel financed by customer fees is raising a stink.
Oct 23, 2013   The New York Times
America’s water infrastructure is behind the times. With over 240,000 water main breaks annually, and only 3.8% of wastewater being reused, the country’s water systems scored a D from the American Society of Civil Engineers on its 2013 report card.
Sep 15, 2013   The Atlantic Cities
In the first in a series of articles exploring 'infrastructure solutions for the next generation', Cynthia Barnett examines the creative ways that communities are solving the problems caused by old and overtaxed water systems.
Jul 14, 2013   Orion Magazine
With the federal government unable to agree on much of anything, state and local taxpayers are bearing the burden for repairing and replacing America's aging infrastructure says a new report from Standard & Poor’s Rating Services.
Oct 29, 2012   The Washington Post
New York City is taking steps to manage the dumping of raw sewage, Mireya Navarro reports.
Feb 23, 2012   New York Times - Green Blog
The EPA estimates the U.S. has $13 billion in wastewater infrastructure. Fast Company explains how innovations in wastewater management using natural processes will change everything.
Dec 6, 2011   Fast Company
Much of the inefficiency surrounding our use and misuse of water derive from entrenched habits formed during previous eras of presumed inexhaustibility of water supplies.  Our wastewater treatment approach has traditionally relied on an infrastructure of centralized municipal water plants where tertiary effluent is recycled.  These plants consume considerable energy and cost to restore all of the water they process.   Opinion
Aug 26, 2011   By Rick Abelson
Buildings in Seattle, including a school, are trying to remove themselves from the urban water grid. More could soon follow.
Apr 28, 2011   The Seattle Times
Urban runoff and contaminated water are creating major ecological damage, even in the United States. One design competition has the goal of rethinking how we handle this crucial resource.
Sep 14, 2010   Metropolis