A new study by researchers at Columbia University estimates how predicted changes in the levels and locations of snowfall will affect water supplies.
Yesterday   The New York Times
Out of sheer necessity, the state of California has embarked on a new process for regulating the use of groundwater.
Nov 20, 2015   Capital Press
San Francisco's water district has become the first in the nation to require newly constructed large buildings to collect and reuse nonpotable water.
Nov 4, 2015   SPUR Blog
As some areas of the country seek out new sources of water, other areas are trying to protect what they have.
Oct 21, 2015   Brookings: The Avenue
Unusually scarce precipitation last winter has left little snow on the mountains, endangering a key California water reserve.
Oct 3, 2015   KPCC
New tools and technologies of the so-called Internet of Things are helping cities get a better handle on water scarcity and overabundance.
Sep 28, 2015   Data-Smart City Solutions
The largest fire in the state history is burning in Washington. This year's particularly bad fires had predictable, perhaps preventable, origins.
Sep 2, 2015   The Seattle Times
Indian Tribes in the Pacific Northwest are using real time data to monitor and support salmon populations on rivers impacted by water and power infrastructure along with the region's ongoing drought.
Aug 28, 2015   Northwest Treaty Tribes
Brown lawns may be less aesthetically pleasing than synthetic lawns, but are they safer?
Aug 16, 2015   Sacramento Bee
A researcher from the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University explains how to use interactive maps to track climate change.
Aug 15, 2015   National Geographic
Existing grey infrastructure in China cannot cope with rapid urban expansion and frequent droughts and floods. Several cities, with Beijing's approval, are experimenting with rainwater capture methods as an alternative.
Jul 13, 2015   Environment & Energy Publishing (E&E)