Safety

October 26, 2015, 2pm PDT
After first launching its program in the Spring, law enforcement and Metro are reminding riders to report instances of sexual harassment on trains and buses
The Source (Metro's blog)
January 18, 2015, 7am PST
A post by the World Band surveys efforts around the world to mainstream gender on public transport—an effort challenged substantially by continued risks to the safety of women.
The World Bank
January 6, 2014, 8am PST
Throughout North America's auto-oriented suburbs, front-facing garages are a common feature of home design. According to Brent Toderian, that design decision has a significant impact on speeding and the quality of neighborhoods.
Huffington Post British Columbia
November 28, 2013, 9am PST
When millions of Americans venture forth from their food comas tomorrow to their nearest mall, the shopping environment may have changed from last year. By design, most shoppers are unlikely to notice the increased security measures.
The New York Times
Blog post
October 31, 2013, 3am PDT
Contrary to popular assumptions, large, transit-oriented cities have lower crime rates than smaller, automobile-oriented cities. Jane Jacobs was right! This column discusses this phenomenon and its implications for transport and land use planning.
Todd Litman
September 28, 2013, 5am PDT
The increase in vehicular speeds, removal of street hawkers, and addition of gated neighborhoods are all seen as contributing to a rise in crimes against women in New Delhi and other Indian cities. How can planning and design reverse this trend?
The New York Times
August 1, 2013, 11am PDT
Strapped for cash, cities across the US have decided to save money by turning off street lights. An investigative series documents the effect of all those darkened lights on crime and economic development in San Diego - home to a $30 million backlog.
Fast Company Co.Exist
July 31, 2013, 12pm PDT
Utilizing an online tool that compares images from Google Street View, researchers have built a better understanding of the 'small, often imperceptible reasons' that make some streets and places feel safer than others.
The Atlantic Cities
July 28, 2013, 5am PDT
For anyone who has ridden in a high-speed train, the idea of a derailment is terrifying. Last week's crash of an Alvia train in Spain made such fears seem less irrational. Yonah Freemark examines whether high-speed rail is a safe mode of travel.
CNN
July 23, 2013, 11am PDT
A new study by researchers at Children's and the University of Pennsylvania concludes that, contrary to popular perception, cities are safer than rural or suburban areas. Higher rates of fatal car accidents outside cities are largely to blame.
philly.com
February 28, 2013, 10am PST
In the fifty years since Jane Jacobs introduced the "eyes on the street" theory, it's become a commonly accepted conceit that a mix of use reduces crime. A new study calls that theory into question.
Next City
January 30, 2013, 1pm PST
In the wake of yesterday's surprisingly unsurprising announcement that U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood is stepping down, several reporters who focus on transportation issues have taken stock of his tenure.
Transportation Nation
Blog post
June 25, 2012, 7pm PDT

I don’t know what it is about New Orleans that makes me wax rhapsodic. But something about the city makes everyday life look poetic.

I returned to the Crescent City last week after having last visited just seven months ago, when a tree planting I participated in was marred by the tragic shooting of a 21-year-old just around the corner in a neighborhood known as Pigeon Town. I knew I had to go back.

Jeffrey Barg
April 9, 2012, 9am PDT
Edward Blakely, co-author of “Fortress America: Gated Communities in the United States,” pens an opinion piece for <em>The Washington Post</em> looking at the detrimental psychology that exists in gated communities such as where Trayvon Martin died.
The Washington Post
September 28, 2011, 11am PDT
Chuck Wolfe asks if a city's vitality is best indicated at night, and how it should be measured.
myurbanist
Blog post
September 11, 2011, 7am PDT

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance– PresidentFranklin D. Roosevelt, 1932

This being the decade anniversary of the World Trade Center and Pentagon terrorist attacks, it seems a good time to consider how our society responds to such threats, and what planners can do to maximize safety.

Todd Litman
August 16, 2011, 10am PDT
Four Florida metropolitan areas recently ranked as the most dangerous places for pedestrians, according to a survey by Transportation America.
New York Times
July 13, 2011, 6am PDT
Plans to redesign the expanded publicly accessible section of the White House's front lawn combine both walkability concerns and safety concerns.
The Architect's Newspaper
May 26, 2011, 6am PDT
Seattle has been named one of the nation's safest p[laces to walk or bike. But some question whether that success will translate into any further improvements in bike and pedestrian infrastructure spending.
Publicola
May 25, 2011, 6am PDT
As aging populations grow, more cities and design organizations are looking at how to make streets safer for older residents.
NPR