The perception that a city has reached its maximum population and nobody else should be allowed in, or nothing should be allowed to change, is limiting the potential of our cities and increasing housing inequality.
Yesterday   The Washington Post - Wonkblog
According to data from the most recent Census, segregation along racial lines has hit an 100-year low in seventy-five percent of U.S. metropolitan areas. Southern and Western cities have showed the most noticeable integration trends.
Dec 15, 2010   The Christian Science Monitor
Blog Post
May 3, 2010   By Samuel Staley
Where will Americans live? Everywhere. The third article in a three-part series based on Joel Kotkin's new book, "The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050," looks at where Americans will live and how our communities will grow to accommodate them.
Mar 23, 2010   AOL News
In the 1950s, nearly 1/5 of Americans moved each year. That trend is quickly reversing. Americans are now staying put in greater numbers than at any time since World War II, and experts have plenty of opinions on why that is.
Jan 28, 2010   New York Times
The tide is turning from the last half century, with population trends heading inward and urban from the sundered seas of suburbia.
Jan 23, 2010   New Urban News
By utilizing rental data Netflix makes freely available, the New York Times has published a Google Maps mashup illustrating the most popular rental titles in each zip code.
Jan 15, 2010   New York Times
Joel Kotkin sees a trend in a 'New Localism'- people aren't moving around like they used to, and it's causing them to reengage with their communities.
Oct 13, 2009   Newsweek
Greenwich cites concerns over aesthetics and liability.
Aug 14, 2009   The New York Times
A new GIS-based service promises to improve on real estate agents by using GIS data to locate promising sites to locate for business.
Jan 9, 2009   BusinessWeek
Charlotte faces a number of challenges in the 21st century, from rising immigration to declining industry to sprawl. This <em>Citistates Report</em> suggests one strategy to harbor a healthy future: go green.
Oct 8, 2008   The Charlotte Observer