Shipping

The Mississippi River handles $7 billion in trade as one of the world's largest navigable inland waterways. A Midwestern drought has brought the river to water levels so low that they threaten to shut down shipping, reports John Schwartz.
Dec 27, 2012   The New York Times
John Metcalfe explores a new kind of hybrid vehicle that could revolutionize trucking and cut down air contaminants in one of the most polluted regions in the country.
May 19, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
The increasing recognition of waterfronts as a recreational and redevelopment asset belies its continued value for trade and industry. Will Doig makes the case for the oft-antagonized shipping industry in the tug-of-war over waterfront real estate.
Mar 14, 2012   Salon
Completed in 1914, the project was the most ambitious undertaking by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in its time. Today, the $5.25 billion upgrade is in the works.
Aug 19, 2011   The New York Times
The Manchester Ship Canal has gone underused for shipping goods for decades, but is now having a resurgence with the realization that barge freight can greatly reduce carbon emissions.
Aug 18, 2011   CNN
Known for its puritanical environmental laws, California's shipping pollution standards just got tougher. The California Air Resource Board voted unanimously to expand the 2009 clean-fuel zone, which mandates ships to use less-polluting fuels.
Jun 27, 2011   The Los Angeles Times
Shipping containers are increasingly being used as a readymade, eco-friendly building material. WebUrbanist highlights a handful of such structures, vernacular or professionally designed.
Mar 7, 2011   WebUrbanist
Hybrid technology for marine transportation is a growing industry, as startup business in New Brunswick, Canada attests.
Jan 17, 2011   New Brunswick Business Journal
Plans to construct a new cargo port near Venice has some conservationists up in arms. They say the plans would exacerbate rising water levels and further endanger the flood-prone ancient city.
Sep 13, 2009   The Guardian
An article posted last week by the Guardian and highlighted yesterday by Treehugger.com cites recent studies as well as data from maritime industry sources that the combination of quantity and quality of low-grade bunker fuel used in the massive engines of freight vessels may result in more emissions than all the cars in the world!  I don’t mean to wax sensationalist here, this is what is stated in the article.  If the truth is anywhere near the statement, then the idea of Opinion
Apr 15, 2009   By Ian Sacs
For the last ten years, the Army Corps of Engineers has been dredging the bottom of Boston Harbor in an effort to make more room for larger cargo ships. Dredging is almost complete on the project.
Oct 27, 2008   The Boston Globe