Landscape Architecture

June 9, 2010, 9am PDT
A varied involvement in architecture, landscaping, planning and product design has allowed the practice of Rios, Clementi, Hale to weather the recession. The designers describe to Marissa Gluck how they have navigated a path through divergent fields.
The Architects Newspaper
February 24, 2010, 12pm PST
Seattle is reclaiming it's right of way to create a pedestrian street. Landscape architects SvR Design Co. and Hewitt presented two different concepts for the park, one that is "measured" and one that "meanders."
Daily Journal of Commerce
February 4, 2010, 1pm PST
Other cities have opened up tall buildings to the public; Pittsburgh envisions doing the same with US Steel, which has a 1-acre flat roof.
PopCity Magazine
Blog post
November 9, 2009, 5am PST
My classmate was up in front of everyone, flapping and flailing, pleading his case and getting shot down at every turn. It was a bit like watching a train wreck in slow motion.

It was also kind of like looking in the mirror.

I’m just more than halfway through a planning school studio project working on the beautiful (no, really) Lower Schuylkill River in Philadelphia. They’ve teamed up about 15 planner/urban designers with about 45 landscape architects, who, as I mentioned last time, are reasonably bonkers. That was about a month and a half ago; since then, I’ve begun to think maybe I’m the one needing a room with padded walls.

Jeffrey Barg
Blog post
September 21, 2009, 7am PDT

Forgive me Olmsted, for I have sinned. I have strayed. I have coveted. I have had doubts.

I have thought about kicking urban design to the curb like a mangy puppy.

Jeffrey Barg
August 30, 2009, 11am PDT
A review of a new book <em>Building Commons and Community</em> by Karl Linn, a landscape architect and psychologist who worked to create vibrant community spaces in abandoned lots and boring institutional settings.
re:place Magazine
August 6, 2009, 11am PDT
In Honolulu, plans for 21 train stations on the new Kapolei to Ala Moana rail are raising eyebrows, primarily because of their significant size. Designers have taken steps to hide the bulk through landscaping and camouflage.
The Honolulu Advertiser
June 3, 2009, 12pm PDT
Barry Diller, IAC, and his wife, Diane Von Furstenburg, a well-known fashion designer, have donated $10 million to the Friends of the High Line, which is a non-profit group that manages the project.
THE DIRT
December 8, 2008, 2pm PST
Landscape architect Paula Meijerink is calling on designers to rethink asphalt, and she's taking her efforts to the streets.
The Boston Globe
September 23, 2008, 12pm PDT
A landscape architect from M.I.T. is proposing to create a whole new ecosystem to address water pollution problems in Italy.
The New York Times
July 20, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>The American Society of Landscape Architects has awarded the Lurie Garden in Chicago's Millennium Park with it's highest honor.</p>
Marketwatch
July 7, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>Landscape architecture firm dlandstudio is taking the stench out of the Gowanus Canal by building a new public park that is beautiful as well as functional.</p>
The New York Sun
June 25, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>Landscape architect Gary Sexton worked on a tight budget and dodged commissions and regulations to create a beautiful vision for downtown Bremerton (near Seattle).</p>
The Seattle Post-Intelligencer
June 6, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Many of famed landscape architect Lawrence Halprin's optimistic 1970s public spaces are being updated and reconsidered. Historic preservationists fight back, but supporters say, "It's a living, breathing space, not a museum."</p>
The Hook (Charlottesville, VA)
Blog post
June 2, 2008, 5pm PDT

My graduate school education left me with a lot of general ideas and a handful of specific ones. One that stuck with me is a concept from landscape architecture: the desire path. Technically, the term means a path where there isn't supposed to be one, a trail of wear and tear that wasn't planned.

Tim Halbur
May 23, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>A national survey shows that despite the depression in the housing market, landscape architects across the U.S. continue to get work.</p>
Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, OR
Blog post
March 26, 2008, 3pm PDT

We’ve been conducting public meetings for years. And it used to be easier. Present the plan. Discuss the plan. Talk about how your plan is better for the neighborhood/community/city/region and provide the conclusion. But things have changed.  

Barbara Faga
Blog post
September 27, 2007, 7am PDT

 We all saw it on the Internet—the fellow at a public meeting being hauled away from the microphone before getting wrestled to the floor and tasered during a Q&A with John Kerry. Fortunately, silencing argumentative speakers with a taser is not a common occurrence at most public meetings. While I might confess that there have been meetings where, in retrospect, one might have secretly wished one was armed with a stun gun, facilitators generally try to avoid confrontation. Yet there’s no denying that sometimes people show up at public meetings looking for a fight, begging for outrage, and hoping to irritate and inflame.

Barbara Faga
Blog post
August 20, 2007, 12pm PDT
Like many others, I tuned into the CNN/YouTube debate a few weeks ago. As a firm believer in citizen involvement, to the point of recently writing a book* full of case studies of public process in action, I found CNN’s broadcast of real people with real questions in real time to be utterly fascinating. The public taking hold of technology, influencing candidates with their frank questions, and getting answers that sounded less scripted and on message—it was a sight to see. YouTubers’ questions of the nine Democratic candidates were succinct and to the point. And no, I did not hear the other 3,000 submitted questions, but the ones that aired on live TV were brilliant. Anderson Cooper even quipped that it might be the end of newscasters.
Barbara Faga
Blog post
June 9, 2007, 7am PDT

Some people choose to work in planning because they see it as a relatively interesting and stable job. Others have dreams of being the equivalent of an all-powerful SimCity-style mayor. However, many choose planning as a career because they want to make a difference in the world. They want to do good and to help those who are the least advantaged. They are attracted by the potential, if limited, for planning to foster environmental justice and social equity.

Ann Forsyth
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