Strategic Planning

July 27, 2015, 6am PDT
All the talk about the Highway Trust Fund can make it seem like the U.S. transportation system. Robert Puentes and Adie Tomer argue that funding is only a symptom of the deeper problem.
Politico
May 3, 2012, 2pm PDT
Mayor Sam Adams pens an opinion piece for <em>Grist</em> in which he considers why Portland is not as well planned as it could be, and how a different approach to planning is necessary for American cities to address their most pressing challenges.
Grist
Blog post
June 25, 2009, 4am PDT

Planning issues are often considered to be conflicts between the interests of different groups, such as neighborhood residents versus developers, or motorist versus transit users. But planning concerns the future, so it often consists of a conflict between the interests of our current and future selves.

Todd Litman
Blog post
March 12, 2008, 11am PDT

Why plan? That’s an important question for a planning skeptic like myself. I’m not at all convinced that conventional public urban planning has much value, despite (or because of?) spending eight years on a city planning commission. Yet, I don’t consider myself an “antiplanner”. I’m happy to leave that role to my friend and virtual colleague Randal O’Toole at the Cato Institute. (He even runs a blog called “The Antiplanner”.)

Urban planning has a role even though, IMO, on balance, its application has had a negative impact on communities and cities. Notably, even the free market (and Nobel Prize winning) economist F.A. Hayek recognized a role for planning in his classic book on political economy The Constitution of Liberty.

The question is: what is planning’s role and, perhaps more importantly, how has this role changed or shifted in modern times?

Samuel Staley