Sea Level Rise

Allison Arieff provides a glimpse to the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research's new exhibit featuring interesting maps of the San Francisco Bay Area.
2 days ago   Medium
South Miami, population 11,657, has had enough with the Florida legislature's intransigence at combatting climate change, so it has launched a secession movement for 24 southern counties to secede from the northern part of the state.
Oct 24, 2014   Sun Sentinel
Climate change and rising seas will mean higher flood risks for cities. But when exactly will impactful flooding become a regular occurrence? New analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists says that time is fast approaching.
Oct 17, 2014   Climate Central
A rich new feature for ProPublica details what's described as "one of the greatest environmental and economic disasters in the nation’s history."
Sep 1, 2014   ProPublica
Voters might not want big changes along San Francisco's waterfront—but one powerful agent there, the Port of San Francisco, is examining new ways to do the business of building in the face of pressures from sea level rise and opposition politics.
Aug 13, 2014   SFGate
Can Louisiana lawmakers succeed in retroactively overthrowing a lawsuit by the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority against 97 oil and gas companies, all while the state's coastline continues to disappear at alarming rates?
May 29, 2014   PBS NewsHour
Acknowledging that rising sea levels are a major concern for waterfront cities in Washington, the Municipal Research and Services Center (MRSC) non-profit put together a review of the current policy and planning efforts to meet the challenge.
May 2, 2014   MRSC Insight
The world’s coastal cities now face an impossible situation as a result of climate change. While the impacts and catastrophes become inevitable, why do cities like San Francisco dither rather than act?
Apr 14, 2014   SPUR
It's not just melting ice that threatens to submerge communities along the East Coast of the U.S. Several other factor are conspiring to raise sea levels. Scientists are racing against time to predict how bad things are going to get, and how fast.
Jan 15, 2014   The New York Times
With much of its highly-developed coastline located just a few feet above sea level, Florida is highly vulnerable to global warming. But you wouldn't know that by the actions (or inaction) of state legislators and business leaders.
Nov 14, 2013   The New York Times
While we won't live to see it, humanity's carbon emissions could one day melt all of the ice on Earth. National Geographic's interactive map shows how the world's coastlines would change when sea levels rise 216 feet. Say goodbye to Florida.
Nov 8, 2013   National Geographic