Grass

August 14, 2013, 9am PDT
With strained water supplies a growing problem throughout the Southwestern U.S., cities from Austin to Los Angeles are using carrots and sticks to coax homeowners into adopting drought-resistant landscapes. Not all are pleased to see the grass go.
The New York Times
July 19, 2010, 9am PDT
The Ohio Department of Transportation is experimenting with "green noise walls" instead of the standard eyesore, using bags of soil sprouting greenery as an alternative to concrete.
The Cleveland Plain Dealer
January 21, 2010, 8am PST
Lawns - long known to be the main culprit in urban water consumption, now can be blamed for another environmental woe - greenhouse gas producer in excess of whatever carbon it 'sinks'. The gas is nitrous oxide - 300 times more potent than CO2.
University of California @Irvine Press Office
September 4, 2009, 5am PDT
Water saver or environmental hazard? Questions are compounding about artificial turf as more homeowners ditch their grass for fake lawns. Contradicting city policies muddy the issue in the arid Southwest.
Miller-McCune
August 9, 2009, 11am PDT
When mandatory water conservation rules took effect in Glendale, California, homeowner David Wood installed artificial turf to maintain the green front yard emblematic of the American Dream. But his new fake lawn is against the law.
Glendale News Press
July 21, 2009, 9am PDT
Cities in the Southwest are drying up. With less water to go around, water-intensive plantings like vast lawns are becoming an environmental faux pas. Now some cities are compensating residents for getting rid of them.
GreenBiz