Careers

August 7, 2015, 9am PDT
A new phase of President Obama's Promise Zone anti-poverty initiative will take place simultaneously in Los Angeles and Philadelphia. AmeriCorps staff will be on hand to provide career coaching to high school students.
Next City
Feature
February 26, 2015, 5am PST
The following interview, as published in the 4th Edition of the Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs, features Jason Neville, senior planner for the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority.
Jason Neville
Blog post
November 26, 2014, 9am PST
At this time of year, many prospective graduate students are asking themselves if they should apply to planning programs. This is a good question. Planning is a diverse field and it can be hard to figure out if it will be the right fit.
Ann Forsyth
Feature
November 20, 2014, 6am PST
The following interview, as published in the 4th Edition of the Planetizen Guide to Graduate Urban Planning Programs, features Kimberly Lucas, bicycle program specialist for the District Department of Transportation.
Kimberly Lucas
September 19, 2012, 12pm PDT
Amanda Hurley explores the gender imbalance present among women in architecture and the "male-dominated world" of development, and questions the societal and biological justifications that many argue are determinants for choosing professional roles.
Architect Magazine
October 13, 2011, 12pm PDT
In the third year Forbes has compiled the list, the new data factors included in this year's survey bumped New York City off the list and moved Buffalo into the top spot out of 50 metropolitan areas.
Forbes
Blog post
October 6, 2009, 8am PDT

The fall is high season for school visits from prospective students. I am a great believer in doing this remotely—while some greenhouse gases are generated by a Google search it is far less than a plane ride to a distant campus. I suggest visiting schools only after you have been admitted (and not even then if you don’t have a really crucial question that can only be answered on site). However, if you can’t bring yourself to even apply to a school in a place you’ve never visited, and promise to buy carbon set asides, a tour may be worth it. The following tips can help you make the most of the school.

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
March 7, 2009, 4pm PST
Finding a first full-time “real” job in planning seems a daunting task at present. However, cities are growing, infrastructure is being funded, and there will be jobs for planners. The following tips can help one navigate the market.

Be prepared to go to Kansas. By this I mean that there are certain places much loved by young planners—New York, Boston, San Francisco—and these are not the best places to start looking for early planning jobs. Sure they have them. For low pay. Where you’ll find yourself at the very bottom of the totem pole with years of photocopying ahead of you before you make it to the zoning counter.

Ann Forsyth
December 16, 2008, 2pm PST
U.S. News and World Report picks Urban Regional Planner as one of thirty careers 'that offer strong outlooks and high job satisfaction.' Architects, on the other hand, are 'overrated'.
U.S. News And World Report
Blog post
August 31, 2008, 8am PDT

At the beginning of semester students are signing up for classes and planning their degrees. Lately, a question I have been asked quite frequently is which classes will make new planners most employable? Students ask if computer aided design or GIS will be key. However, surveys of planning practitioners show that a far more basic set of skills is important—skills in communication, information analysis and synthesis, political savvy, and basic workplace competencies and attitudes.

Below, I highlight three of these studies from across three decades:

Ann Forsyth