Urban Density

March 1, 2015, 11am PST
What they may lack in peace and quiet, crowded cities more than make up for by requiring residents to live smaller. Tangible environmental benefits follow.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
February 24, 2015, 7am PST
Despite its economic dynamism, Mumbai is known for a lack of adequate housing. Citywide increases to maximum Floor Space Indices (i.e., Floor Area Ratios) will increase living space per resident, provided the right redevelopment takes place.
Vox
July 16, 2014, 1pm PDT
Students in Atlanta have designed a tiny house village inside a parking garage to help better understand how livable micro-housing projects can be.
Pop-Up City
Blog post
March 14, 2014, 7am PDT
You do not hear much talk about meaningful urbanism in the Southeast U.S. Until political winds shift, don't expect that to change.
Mark Hough
Blog post
April 13, 2013, 5pm PDT
While the middle class sought the refuge in the suburbs in the 1960s and 1970s, it turns out that the crime they were fleeing had nothing to do with density, race, or even blight. Mother Jones magazine suggest that it was all because of lead.
Josh Stephens
January 11, 2013, 5am PST
Edward L. Glaeser takes the recent purchase of Zipcar by Avis as the jumping-off point for an essay on the ways that technology, which once aided the sprawling suburban lifestyle, can now amplify the sharing of infrastructure by city dwellers.
The Boston Globe
June 12, 2012, 10am PDT
As cities across the world look for ways to blend higher densities to accommodate the increased demand for urban living, a recent proposal for how to solve Stockholm's critical lack of housing in the core of the city may define "inelegant density."
ArchDaily
March 27, 2012, 11am PDT
John King considers a new report released by the Census Bureau on Monday, which finds that of the ten most densely populated urbanized areas in the United States, nine are in the West.
San Francisco Chronicle
June 21, 2011, 2pm PDT
Edward Glaeser adds "large-scale metropolitan farming" to a list -- which also includes historic preservation -- of barriers to densifying urban development patterns. His argument is that the latter is the greener of the two.
Boston Globe
Blog post
January 27, 2010, 7am PST

In an earlier post, I discussed the difference between mobility, accessibility, and transportation technology. In today’s post, I want to discuss what I think is the next step in this taxonomy in terms of the implications for the built environment and urban planning. More specifically, we need to move beyond the idea that certain transportation technologies—whether it is a car, a bus, a train, or our feet—are substitutes.

Samuel Staley
July 19, 2009, 5am PDT
Americans will be forced to change their lifestyles as fuel prices rise. NPR's "Talk of the Nation" talks to author Chris Steiner about the good that might result.
National Public Radio