Energy

As gas prices rise and the hype ramps up again about electric cars as the "solution" to green mobility in cities, I find myself busy once again pointing out that the biggest challenge in cities when it comes to how we get around, isn't about what comes out of the tailpipe of your car. Opinion
Apr 29, 2014   By Brent Toderian
<p>Rolling Stone pundit Matt Taibbi writes that the media are missing the real story: that millions of Americans are financially drowning under home heating costs, gas prices and debt, and the middle class is disappearing.</p>
Jul 24, 2008   AlterNet
<p>The Department of Energy is proposing to construct massive "energy corridors", land designated solely for the purpose of energy conduction like oil, hydrogen and electricity.</p>
Jul 15, 2008   Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments
<p>If buildings are responsible for almost half of the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, then our energy and building codes are incredibly important tools attaining energy and climate sanity.</p>
Jul 11, 2008   Gristmill
<p>Critic John King reflects on how common assumptions of Bay Area residents about urban growth boundaries and protesting nuclear power are challenged by the growing problem of climate change and energy access.</p>
Jul 2, 2008   The San Francisco Chronicle
<p>This article from <em>Next American City</em> looks at escalators -- the expensive, energy-intensive, and often under-used transportation mode.</p>
Jun 27, 2008   The Next American City
<p>An avalanche decimates an Alaskan city's energy infrastructure, leading residents to craft creative ways to conserve energy and lower their utility bills.</p>
Jun 18, 2008   The Next American City
<p>Bethlehem Steel left 25 years ago, but a new, mysterious energy company is brining a glimmer of hope to Lackawanna, New York. The proposed plant, to be built on Bethlehem's brownfields, would convert petroleum coke into synthetic gas.</p>
Jun 18, 2008   The Buffalo News
<p>Protests both peaceful and violent are breaking out across Europe and Asia as people's livelihoods begin to suffer from soaring fuel costs, and some stores are running out of food as truck drivers go on strike.</p>
Jun 16, 2008   This Is London
<p>One of the hosts of Mythbusters turns his eye on new ideas for energy sources, from grape juice to used tires.</p>
Jun 5, 2008   Mother Jones
<p>With dramatically increasing fuel costs, European consumers formerly amenable to "green" taxes are turning against them, leading to fears that ambitious emission-control policies may not be achievable.</p>
May 29, 2008   The Globe & Mail