High Cost of Free Parking

April 6, 2016, 5am PDT
The city of Charlottesville, home to the University of Virginia, has approved a controversial measure to begin charging for on-street parking in the city's downtown.
C-Ville Weekly
January 13, 2016, 8am PST
A new study presented at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting builds a strong case that parking causes driving.
CityLab
September 12, 2014, 11am PDT
San Francisco's voters are continuing their trend of deciding complex and difficult planning issues at the ballot box. Last time it was height restrictions—this time it's parking.
SF Streetsblog
August 3, 2014, 5am PDT
In yet another illustration of the high cost of free parking, Eric Jaffe reports on a study by two Virginia Tech transportation scholars that analyze all types of commuter transportation benefits and how they influence choice of commute mode.
CityLab
June 8, 2014, 5am PDT
The Cleveland City Council this week approved a new ordinance that gives away city-owned parking for free for the Cleveland Browns to use—and charge for—during games. High cost of free parking indeed.
19 Action News
June 19, 2012, 1pm PDT
A bill in California that would reduce parking minimums in transit-oriented areas has drawn opposition from an unlikely group: the American Planning Association.
California Planning & Development Report
January 11, 2012, 11am PST
For those who missed it, Friday brought the end to the influential infrastructure focused blog -- The Infrastructurist
The Infrastructurist
April 10, 2011, 1pm PDT
Parking guru Donald Shoup writes for the Cato Institute, a libertarian think-tank, explaining why free markets and free parking go together.
Cato Institute
Blog post
July 8, 2009, 7pm PDT

Everybody knows that most, if not all, of downtown businesses' customers arrive by car.  So it's intuitive to try to come up with a way to encourage drivers - who normally wouldn't venture downtown - to hop into their rides and cruise on down to Main Street to shop for wares.  If we could do this, just think of all the new business we'd be stimulating!  In continuing with this logic, it's also a given that it's impossible for would-be customers to actually get to downtown without the essential attaché to driving, gasoline.  So, isn't it therefore intuitive to suggest that if cities were to give away a little bit of gas to each customer – you know, to kind-of thank them for their generosity - then customers would find an overwhelming incentiv

Ian Sacs