Families

July 16, 2016, 9am PDT
That headlining claim is found in a recent research study from Pew Charitable Trust's Philadelphia Research Initiative—more demographic goodies are included.
NewsWorks
June 13, 2016, 8am PDT
U.S. cities leave a lot to be desired for raising a family. However, is it really a worthwhile goal to make cities family friendly? Marin Gertler, a San Diego architect ponders the question after a recent visit to New York City.
UrbDeZine
June 7, 2016, 10am PDT
Without children at the center of activity, the urban neighborhoods of today offer little compared to the ideals expressed by Jane Jacobs, according to this strongly worded critique of contemporary urbanism.
The American Conservative
April 12, 2016, 7am PDT
There's a new volley in the long-running battle between cities and suburbs. In his new book "The Human City," urban scholar Joel Kotkin contends that cities and their planners have lost sight of the residents who matter most: families.
California Planning & Development Report
November 18, 2015, 8am PST
Governing magazine digs into the data about which cities American families are more likely to call home.
Governing
August 25, 2015, 11am PDT
Low crime rates and affordable property preoccupy adults, but kids need something more: the ability to walk the streets and play out on their own. In The Guardian, Viv Groskop explores the "popsicle test" and other elements of child-friendly cities.
The Guardian
Blog post
August 25, 2015, 9am PDT
Joel Kotkin argues that Jane Jacobs's insights are of limited value because cities are no longer useful for middle-class families.
Michael Lewyn
July 3, 2015, 1pm PDT
Millennials are loving their center cities these days, with their lofts and bars and yoga studios. But what happens when Millennials start to have families and don't quite fit, physically or culturally, into city life anymore?
Next City
May 16, 2015, 1pm PDT
With their reputation for decent schools, lower crime, and affordable housing, suburbs can be an attractive prospect for young families. Can cities retain that demographic? Should they?
The Washington Post
April 14, 2015, 8am PDT
What helps make a downtown family friendly? Safe places to play, safe streets, good schools and attainable housing, writes Jennifer Hill.
Community Builders
March 6, 2015, 1pm PST
Instead of "Bikers First!" or "Creative Class First!" James Siegel, president of Kaboom!, proposes an alternative for cities: "Kids First!"
Medium
February 17, 2015, 10am PST
Many rankings try to tell parents where the best places are to raise their kids. But measures that focus solely on narrow criteria like safety and schools often ignore the benefits of diverse, vibrant urban environments.
Family Friendly Cities
February 5, 2015, 6am PST
In a post from the new Plan.Place blog, the author explores the city with a two-year-old as his guide and offers reflections on viewing the urban landscape anew--from an elevation of 34 inches and with a renewed sense of wonder.
Plan.Place
September 15, 2014, 10am PDT
Philadelphia Inquirer Architecture Critic Inga Saffron is the latest to respond to an article in the Washington Post asking whether family-friendly cities make economic sense.
Philadelphia Inquirer
August 20, 2014, 12pm PDT
With the Millennial boom in many urban centers, many cities are looking for ways to retain young families rather than losing them to the traditional suburban exodus. One columnist dares to ask: Do cities even need kids?
The Washington Post
May 5, 2014, 1pm PDT
Data in Virginia shows that more young families are choosing to stay in urban areas to raise their children. This is causing a rapid increase in school enrollment and fueling the fastest growth Virginia's urban areas have experienced since the 1950s.
University of Virginia Center for Public Service
January 8, 2014, 2pm PST
Data suggesting a dramatic shift toward the urban core are accruing in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Suburbs have responded by creating walkable downtowns, but are struggling with declining school enrollment and other consequences.
Star Tribune
Blog post
December 18, 2013, 3pm PST
While there's no denying the fact that the number of children in many American cities has declined, it's untrue that urban life is incompatible with raising a family, or that families in cities are being replaced by singles and childless couples.
Shane Phillips
August 14, 2013, 11am PDT
Tanya Snyder wades into the ongoing discussion over whether America's urban revival can be sustained, a question that essentially hinges on whether cities are creating an attractive alternative to the suburbs for raising children.
DC.Streetsblog
April 26, 2013, 6am PDT
According to Mark Funkhouser, former mayor of Kansas City, there may be no better measure of a city's livability than whether parents want to raise children there. He explains why everyone benefits when sidewalks are filled with baby strollers.
Governing