Population Growth

January 13, 2011, 5am PST
RThe impact of cities is spreading beyond local and even national borders, argues Robert Neuwirth in this piece from <em>What Matters</em>.
What Matters
January 9, 2011, 1pm PST
China is building millions of housing units. But is the country building neighborhoods?
The Wall Street Journal
January 3, 2011, 1pm PST
National Geographic tackles the controversial issue of population growth, and the sustainability of a growing population. Should we worry about maxing out the planet? Not necessarily, according to Nat. Geo.
National Geographic
December 29, 2010, 9am PST
Nevada was the fastest growing state in the nation over the last ten years, but amid that growth has been a severe economic downturn.
The New York Times
December 22, 2010, 11am PST
The first piece of data from the 2010 U.S. Census has been released, showing state-by-state population information. <em>The Urbanophile</em> offers three maps that document how the country has changed since the last Census in 2000.
The Urbanophile
December 2, 2010, 8am PST
Over the past 30 years, the overgrown Iranian capital has arrived at unhealthy levels of air pollution and traffic congestion, but with the installation of a metro, BRT system, and bike rental program seems to be heading in a new direction.
TheCityFix
October 21, 2010, 9am PDT
The latest issue of <em>Nature</em> looks at the implications of an increasingly urban world on the field of science, and the field's impact on cities.
Nature
October 17, 2010, 1pm PDT
In the face of climate change and sea level rise, <em>Popular Science</em> offers four designs for urban lifestyles of the near future.
Popular Science
October 16, 2010, 1pm PDT
Freshwater is becoming increasingly scarce. Our cities will need to address these shortages with better design, according to author Steven Solomon.
Grist
September 29, 2010, 8am PDT
With more than 750,00 people expected to add on to the city's population over the next 30 years, officials and locals in Austin are trying to map out how the city should grow and change to handle the influx.
Austin American-Statesman
September 22, 2010, 8am PDT
Freshwater resources are running out and being overused -- a global crisis that can be seen in the declining flows of the Colorado River.
Smithsonian Magazine
September 18, 2010, 1pm PDT
Aaron M. Renn says that Iowa has weathered the recession well, and migration patterns have boosted cities and agribusiness.
New Geography
September 1, 2010, 6am PDT
Singapore, one of the world's most livable cities, is facing a population boom that some say will give the city a crowded and unpleasant future. Recent weather-related destruction highlight some of its growing pains.
Yahoo
August 27, 2010, 7am PDT
<em>Wired</em> presents a slideshow of photography exploring the booming Chinese city of Chongqing -- the fastest growing urban center in the world.
Wired
August 17, 2010, 12pm PDT
Five years after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, the Brookings Institution offers an analysis of the city's recovery. This op-ed looks at the report, which finds the city improving, but with many areas needing increased focus.
New Orleans Times-Picayune
August 13, 2010, 6am PDT
Despite a growing population and limited amounts of rainfall, the city of El Paso, Texas, has been able to effectively manage its water supplies -- and reduce use.
Grist
August 2, 2010, 10am PDT
A population research group reports on two simultaneously occurring population trends in the world affecting developed and less developed nations: Working age adults have dropped precipitously, while poorer nations grow too fast.
The New York Times - World
July 25, 2010, 5am PDT
"Officials argue that the main problem with Cairo is not that it is too big, but that three-quarters of its inhabitants are concentrated in a 20km radius from the center," reports Heba Saleh
Financial Times
July 23, 2010, 9am PDT
Aaron M. Renn dissects the "Venus-Mars" split between the high quality and high quantity model and argues that "an hourglass America is not one most of us want to live in for the long term."
New Geography
May 5, 2010, 7am PDT
The U.S. is expected to grow by more than 100 million people over the next 40 years, and much of that growth will occur in urban areas. Joel Kotkin says that this growth will highlight the inefficiencies of centralized power.
Governing