Population Growth

Biology Professor Paul Ehrlich's 1968 book, "The Population Bomb," took America and the world by storm. The apocalyptic vision based of population outgrowing its resources appeared to make inherent sense.
8 hours ago   The New York Times - Retro Report
Urbanists got excited when new population data from the U.S. Census Bureau suggested bigger growth in cities compared to their suburbs. Eric Jaffe interviews Columbia professor David King on why this isn't necessarily true.
Jul 19, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Carol Morello and Patricia Sullivan explore the recent population spike in Washington, D.C., part of a nationwide trend toward "an urban renaissance."
Jun 30, 2012   Washington Post
A new paper by a group of international scientists warns that the planet may be at the tipping point of causing a rapid irreversible transition to a "state unknown in human experience," reports Bettina Boxall
Jun 9, 2012   Los Angeles Times
Unlike Asia and South America, sub-Saharan Africa did not see birthrates fall in the second half of the 20th century. As a result, urban life in Nigeria heralds the challenges facing an increasingly populous planet, Elisabeth Rosenthal reports.
Apr 18, 2012   The New York Times
More people leave the 9-county region than migrate there from other states. In fact, the population would be in decline if it wasn't for foreign migration. Notably missing from the report on Census data is the birth rate for the region.
Apr 5, 2012   Bay Citizen
A conference held in London last Tuesday, called "Planet Under Pressure," provided a forum to begin to answer the question, reports Roxanne Palmer.
Apr 2, 2012   International Business Times
An interactive visualization recently released by Unicef presents a startling picture of the world's urban population growth from 1950 to 2050. Mark Wilson deconstructs its implications.
Mar 21, 2012   Fast Company Co:Design
John K. McIlwain breaks down the recent explosion in the "65-or-better" population – and what it means for urban regions.
Mar 2, 2012   Urban Land
The recession has taken its toll on U.S. population growth - both in babies born and immigration. While the recession officially ended June, 2009, growth rates continue to lag for the second consecutive year at .7%, the lowest since the Depression.
Feb 21, 2012   USA Today
A new report by one of China's premier academic research organizations has warned about rising discrepancies between the growth of China's cities and their ability to provide the resources necessary to serve those populations.
Feb 13, 2012   China Daily