Population Growth

After a decade of incredible growth, a tightening job market has finally slowed the domestic migration into Washington D.C.
4 days ago   Washington Post
To accomodate America's expected population growth by 2050, the country will need to build up to 74 million new homes. This challenge presents a unique opportunity to reshape our urban environment, says Enrique Penalosa, the former mayor of Bogota.
May 1, 2013   Urban Land
In this op-ed, Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore analyze the recent Census findings showing renewed migration from the Northeast and Midwest to the South and Southwest. They note the movement is clearly from blue states to red, and explain why.
Apr 5, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
New Census data shows that after a recession induced respite, "Americans have resumed moving from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South," reports Neil Shah. Four of the nation's fastest growing large metro areas are located in Texas.
Mar 14, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
China's slowing economy has prompted calls from economists to reconsider the "one-child" policy that has contributed to a shrinking labor pool. It's annual population growth rate was .57% for 2000-2010. By comparison, the U.S. rate was .97%
Jan 23, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
Worried about feeding the world's growing population, especially as it increases meat consumption and farmland is impacted by climate change? No fear - improved crop technology and slowing world growth will allow farms to be converted to wildlands.
Dec 20, 2012   Reuters - U.S.
Despite all odds, “Miami’s roller coaster real estate market is booming again” reports Nadja Brandt. Is "the hottest [residential] real estate market in the U.S." primed to boil over?
Nov 22, 2012   Business Week
Jed Kolko examines America's most diverse neighborhoods and finds that not only are they mostly located in the suburbs, but that they also have higher population growth and faster-rising home prices compared to less-diverse neighborhoods.
Nov 16, 2012   Trulia
Since the September 11 attacks, the areas in and surrounding Lower Manhattan have experienced an increase in the population of young, educated workers, reports Sam Roberts. Farther-off suburbs are seeing their share of such high-value workers shrink.
Oct 23, 2012   The New York Times
Wendell Cox delves into the latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau that have prompted some to herald a return to America's downtowns, and argues that reports of such population growth are vastly overblown.
Oct 2, 2012   New Geography
Nate Berg looks at new data released by the U.S. Census Bureau that puts hard numbers behind what people across the country have observed: America's downtowns are booming again.
Sep 28, 2012   The Atlantic Cities