Population Growth

In some places in the United States, mostly in Florida, some suburban cities have become the big kids on the block.
4 days ago   Panethos
A local blogger takes umbrage with claims that Austin's density is causing its traffic problems. The obvious problem with that argument: Austin is 68% as dense now as it was in 1950.
Feb 18, 2015   Car Free Austin
A recent spate of articles pronounced the resurrection of the suburb, so CityLab laid the false dichotomies that drive such proclamations to rest.
Jan 28, 2015   CityLab
The Oklahoma Gazette takes an in-depth look at the city's efforts to attract and retain millennials.
Jan 11, 2015   Oklahoma Gazette
The city of London has completed a long and remarkable comeback to the population level set as its standard back in 1939.
Jan 7, 2015   Citymetric
William H. Frey, Brookings Institution demographer, writes on the latest Census Bureau demographic data. California and Texas remain number one and two respectively. New York had 19.7 million residents on July 1, 2014, Florida 19.9 million people.
Jan 4, 2015   Brookings
New demographic data released Dec. 11 by the state Department of Finance shows the state grew by 335,000 people to 38.5 million, nearly one percent, despite a declining birth rate. While the most in six years, the growth rate has slowed overall.
Dec 13, 2014   San Francisco Chronicle
More people translates to more emissions, right? Cut back on population growth and you'll reduce emissions and the threat of climate change, along with other environmental woes—it's a no-brainer. Or is it?
Nov 16, 2014   The Washington Post - Wonkblog
When China relaxed its rigid one-child policy last November, health officials were expecting an additional two million births to result. As of Sept. 30, they have received only 804,000 applications from eligible couples.
Nov 11, 2014   The Wall Street Journal
According to the latest figures from the U.S. Census 2013 American Community Survey (ACS), Americans continue to move into cities en masse over suburbs, but certain cities are attracting larger crowds than others.
Oct 10, 2014   USA Today
"A new report out of Rutgers University reveals that since 2010, the fringes of the New York region have lost population as the core has grown," according to an article by Stephen Miller.
Oct 6, 2014   StreetsBlog NYC