Urban Landscape

Blog post
July 6, 2015, 2pm PDT
Continuing to heap praise onto James Corner and his firm, Field Operations, may seem like an exercise in redundancy at this point. But there is little doubt that all of the attention is good for landscape architects—and for cities.
Mark Hough
Blog post
June 25, 2013, 10am PDT
Two events held in the same week in the historic heart of Paris show just how serious the city is about its contemporary urban landscape.
Mark Hough
August 30, 2012, 5am PDT
As the city of Bordeaux, France, makes plans to move up the list of major European cities, it's calling on a multidisciplinary design competition for ways to revitalize its city from the top down by integrating "natural areas."
The Design Observer Group
July 4, 2012, 9am PDT
Brian Phelps reports on the power of urban landscaping to revitalize a flood-devastated city - Valencia, Spain.
Metropolis
June 26, 2012, 10am PDT
Benjamin Wellington, Student ASLA, favorably reviews Peter Del Tredici’s field guide to naturally-growing plants in urban areas.
THE DIRT
December 7, 2010, 12pm PST
Hong Kong's oldest living resident, the banyan tree, once lined entire streets in the city and provided an iconic presence that many enjoyed and many felt classified as a nuisance. Now, due to urban expansion, only a cluster of twenty trees remain.
The Wall Street Journal
October 20, 2009, 10am PDT
A photography show in 1975 is credited with changing the way artists looked at landscape, shifting towards looking at the built environment with a less romantic viewpoint. The original show is back on tour and opens at the LA County Museum of Art.
artinfo.com
July 15, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>The New Yorker traces the history of the American lawn from 1841, commenting on their unnatural origins, and finally analyzing the alternatives suggested by anti-lawn movements.</p>
The New Yorker
June 10, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>A new San Francisco plan seeks to follow in the footsteps of cities like Copenhagen and Portland in revitalizing streets, alleys, medians, and crosswalks. The goal is to bring the city's outdoors to its 'rightful place as the center of civic life.'</p>
The San Francisco Chronicle
Blog post
June 2, 2008, 5pm PDT

My graduate school education left me with a lot of general ideas and a handful of specific ones. One that stuck with me is a concept from landscape architecture: the desire path. Technically, the term means a path where there isn't supposed to be one, a trail of wear and tear that wasn't planned.

Tim Halbur
March 8, 2008, 7am PST
<p>A team of researchers has shown that in urban landscapes -- such as in the cracks of sidewalks -- plant species must evolve their reproduction habits to stay alive.</p>
MSNBC