The High Line

The Atlantic recently ran a piece on the landscape architect James Corner, who has become a celebrity of sorts in the world of urban design. Blog Post
Jul 6, 2015   By Mark Hough
That's how Inga Saffron describes New York's High Line, the unique park built into unused infrastructure that has cities clamoring for their own version. Philadelphia might get one too, on the Reading Viaduct.
Jun 24, 2011   The Philadelphia Inquirer
New York's High Line park isn't just a nice place for a stroll. Mayor Bloomberg credits the line with creating over 12,000 new jobs and $2 billion in private development.
Jun 6, 2011   The New York Times
Just as Witold Rybczynski declares New York's High Line un-copyable, St. Louis announces plans for a linear park on top of an old railroad trestle
May 19, 2011   St. Louis Post Dispatch
Witold Rybczynski thinks not, saying that the success of the project's "landscape urbanism" is its remarkably dense and urban setting, not the hip design and landscaping.
May 17, 2011   The New York Times
New York City's High Line was an instant success when it opened in the rapidly gentrifying Meatpacking District in June of 2009. The park attracted two million visitors in its first year and is widely viewed as economic boon to the neighborhood. Exclusive
Dec 13, 2010  By Lynn Vande Stouwe
Monocle magazine interviews James Corner, the landscape architect responsible for New York's lauded high line and recent winner of Cooper Hewitt Award for best landscape architect.
Jul 24, 2010   Monocle
The High Line park in New York has been an enormous success, attracting 2 million visitors so far. Tom Topousis got to take a tour of the 2nd section of the park under construction, stretching from 20th to 30th Sts.
Jul 8, 2010   The New York Post
The new park takes an old waterfront park and connects it with previously inaccessible space to create an 85-acre site stretching 1.3 miles along the waterfront.
Mar 6, 2010   Design Trust blog
Cities around the world are finding that turning industrial ruins into green public space is far more cost effective and fun than tearing them down.
Nov 11, 2009   The Walrus
Architect Ronald Rael proposes preserving the discarded span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge and turning it into a park and mixed-use development, in the spirit of NY's High Line.
Sep 10, 2009   Streetsblog SF