Singapore

January 8, 2016, 12pm PST
A plan in Singapore to transform the former Keretapi Tanah Melayu railway will create a linear park ten times longer than the High Line.
Quartz
April 12, 2015, 5am PDT
While they look clean and green on the drawing board, Asia's planned developments might be nothing more than cloned commercialism set in concrete. By undermining local culture, this 'smart city' approach may also prove unsustainable.
The Global Urbanist
September 27, 2014, 11am PDT
With rapidly urbanizing metro areas, some cities are not looking to build up, or spread out, anymore. Rather they have begun to grow into underground spaces.
Bloomberg News
September 25, 2014, 10am PDT
Researchers at MIT have developed a new, flexible congestion pricing system.
Wired
August 6, 2014, 11am PDT
Known for its density with nearly 20,000 people per square mile, Singapore is changing its food systems strategy to produce more food locally, and reduce food waste.
Fast Company Co.Exist
June 14, 2014, 9am PDT
Urban Times offers a list of 13 urban river renewal projects spanning from Medellin to Manila.
Urban Times
September 26, 2013, 12pm PDT
Singapore has built skywards and taken back land from the sea to accommodate its booming population. But as the city-state runs out of options for future growth, it's looking underground to build infrastructure, offices, and even public spaces.
The New York Times
September 23, 2013, 5am PDT
Build more lanes, improve operations, let cars do the driving: Are these the best ways to reduce traffic congestion? Richard Mudge thinks a more effective route may be to offer financial incentives to keep people off the roads.
Eno Brief Newsletter
September 3, 2013, 2pm PDT
Asia's mega-malls have been booming for over a decade, many built atop former park space, and now are suffering from high vacancy rates and low consumer spending.
Quartz
January 25, 2013, 11am PST
Armed with lessons learned from Singapore’s successful urbanization experience, the Urban Land Institute (ULI) has published a new report that identifies ten principles for creating liveable high density cities.
ULI
November 10, 2012, 9am PST
Across the strait from Singapore, Iskandar Malaysia is being planned as the world’s next eco mega-city. Its architects and developers hope it will offer an alternative to Asia's polluted cities and a glimpse of the future of urban living.
The Guardian
October 2, 2012, 9am PDT
Smoking is physically harmful to smokers and non-smokers alike, but what about its impact on public space? Nate Berg reports on a new paper in Urban Studies based on interviews in Singapore -- where smoking has been regulated since 1970.
The Atlantic Cities
August 20, 2012, 1pm PDT
Bill Hooper looks at the global effort to reinvent the airport as a place where people will actually <em>want</em> to spend time.
Fast Company Co.Exist
July 27, 2012, 1pm PDT
Singapore de-channelizes an urban river as part of a plan to preserve more of its rainwater, creating a park in the process.
THE DIRT
July 4, 2012, 1pm PDT
Singapore has a robust public housing program, which comes from the government operating 80% of the housing stock. Neal Peirce spells out how the system works.
The Citistates Group
May 3, 2012, 8am PDT
Noah Kazis describes the explosive success of transit systems in London, Stockholm, and Singapore, and suggests that charging motorists for road use is the secret ingredient that keeps ridership high and public support strong.
Streetsblog
October 5, 2011, 12pm PDT
Richard Florida ranks countries based on the proportion of workers in the 'creative class.' He ranks the U.S. 27th in the world, trailing a top ten including Singapore, the Netherlands, Australia, Germany and Switzerland.
The Atlantic Cities
August 7, 2011, 1pm PDT
Like the Hamptons for affluent New Yorkers, Singapore emerges as the go-to real estate hot spot - replacing Hong Kong - for wealthy Chinese. "It confers class status in China to say that you own a flat in Singapore," asserts Mohamed Ismail.
The Economist
July 31, 2011, 7am PDT
As Singapore's population booms, officials are working through plans to help the city absorb its people but also provide them with adequate green space.
The New York Times
July 11, 2011, 8am PDT
U. of Toronto economist Matthew Turner discusses his study that shows that building more traffic lanes attracts more traffic. Likewise, providing more transit may lure motorists out of their cars, but those motorists are replaced.
NPR:All Things Considered