Walkability

Researchers continue to verify the health benefits of walkable neighborhoods. Most recently researchers at Kansas University found benefits that communities can use to ensure the quality of life of aging residents.
Nov 29, 2014   Kansas University
The Bacon's Rebellion blog focuses on the potential of suburbs to meet the demands of a growing population with different lifestyles and expectations for their communities than previous generations.
Oct 9, 2014   Bacon's Rebellion
Instead of density for density's sake (or for smart growth's sake), F. Kaid Benfield argues that the human scale is the key to walkable smart growth.
Oct 8, 2014   Huffington Post
David Alpert and Jarrett Walker go head to head debating the merit of streetcar systems in many United States cities and suburbs and their efficiency at creating urban, walkable communities.
Oct 3, 2014   CityLab
A new cross-disciplinary report cites 32 case studies to offer practical solutions for integrating trees into civic spaces and surface car parks.
Oct 2, 2014   Trees in Hard Landscapes: A Guide for Delivery
Bill Lindeke examines a few examples of mobile technology that encourage citizens to ditch their cars and walk. Could these technologies inspire the cultural side of the equation needed for widespread adoption of walkability?
Sep 29, 2014   MinnPost
In a recent Huffington Post article, F. Kaid Benfield of the Natural Resources Defense Council breaks down some of the barriers for walkability in the United States.
Sep 4, 2014   Huffington Post
Andy Singer reviews the new Complete Streets Design Manual Draft for the city of Saint Paul, Minnesota.
Aug 23, 2014   Streets MN
Dave Munson discovered the neighborhoods throughout the United States that are both affordable by his salary and walkable.
Aug 22, 2014   Munson's City
Parking guru Donald Shoup discusses how the city of Los Angeles can fix its roughly 4,300 miles of sidewalk that require some degree of repair, for free.
Aug 21, 2014   Los Angeles Times
Efforts to grow a downtown in a historically neglected part of Washington, D.C. would do more than bring business to the area. Studies show that the built environment has huge impacts on health—obesity, asthma, and even teen pregnancy.
Aug 14, 2014   Elevation DC