Walking

Blog post
February 13, 2014, 2pm PST
Are suburbanites less fearful of crime than city-dwellers? Maybe not.
Michael Lewyn
January 29, 2014, 2pm PST
San Diego's downtown street grid features smaller blocks than almost all other major U.S. cities. Small blocks mean more intersections, less distance between them, and a lot of interrupted bipedaling. Bill Adams reviews some potential fixes.
UrbDeZine.com
January 18, 2014, 5am PST
It's no accident that the Cleveland suburb of Lakewood is one of the few school districts in Ohio without buses. Choices made by planners, parents, and school officials have preserved the inner-ring suburb as a “walking school district.”
DC.Streetsblog
December 27, 2013, 9am PST
By expanding its transit and cycling infrastructure and creating pedestrian-friendly streets, L.A. is improving access to alternative forms of transportation. But in the city's most walkable area, police are out to prove the car is still king.
The New York Times
December 20, 2013, 5am PST
It's been 21 years (and counting) since D.C. developed plans to build the Metropolitan Branch Trail's eight mile northern segment. The delayed project threatens the city's goal of increasing the proportion of biking and walking trips to 25 percent.
WNYC: Transportation Nation
December 14, 2013, 1pm PST
Multiple metrics have been developed to measure which areas are the most friendly to pedestrians. But by looking at Census Data on commuting patterns, one can glean which city's residents are making the most of their "walkable" environs.
Governing
December 12, 2013, 11am PST
At America's first ever "Walking Summit", physicians, planners, developers, and community activists gathered to discuss how physical activity can help heal people and communities.
PPS Placemaking Blog
December 6, 2013, 10am PST
A new report from the National Center for Safe Routes to School finds that the percentage of students walking to and from school "increased significantly" between 2007 and 2012.
DC.Streetsblog
November 29, 2013, 5am PST
Gas tax increases can mean more road funding, period, particularly where constitutional restrictions prohibit spending gas tax revenues on other modes, as exists in Pa.; yet all modes will benefit from the 28-cent gas tax increase legislation.
Streetsblog
Blog post
November 28, 2013, 9am PST
Some commentators recently expressed outraged that governments spend money on cycling facilities. Their arguments are largely wrong, I’ll call them "half-truths" to be charitable, presented with great certitude and self-righteous anger.
Todd Litman
November 26, 2013, 5am PST
Paul Salopek is embarking on a 21,000-mile, 7-year stroll around the world. After traversing 1,700 miles, his most profound insights focus on the impact of the century-old automotive revolution on our psyche - what he calls "Car Brain".
The New York Times
Blog post
October 31, 2013, 3am PDT
Contrary to popular assumptions, large, transit-oriented cities have lower crime rates than smaller, automobile-oriented cities. Jane Jacobs was right! This column discusses this phenomenon and its implications for transport and land use planning.
Todd Litman
October 3, 2013, 12pm PDT
Mahatma Gandhi's utilization of non-violent civil disobedience to fight for civil rights is taught to school children around the world, but his views on the importance of biking and walking are less well known. Navdeep Asija investigates.
The City Fix
September 26, 2013, 6am PDT
While bike commuting is gaining nationwide, it's actually dropping in Portland which has held the enviable title of tops in bike commuting for large cities since 2005. Minneapolis and Seattle, #2 and #3 respectively, are gaining, warns BikePortland.
BikePortland
August 21, 2013, 7am PDT
In advance of their annual biking, walking, and placemaking conference, the Project for Public Spaces identifies five elements that the make Pittsburgh a unique destination for 'rolling and strolling'.
PPS: Placemaking Blog
August 5, 2013, 7am PDT
London has always been a pedestrian-friendly city. But over the last decade the number of daily trips taken on foot in the city jumped by 12 percent, while walking declined nationwide. What explains the capital's pedestrian popularity?
The Economist
July 23, 2013, 12pm PDT
Cars kill us and drive us crazy; while walking and biking improve our mental and physical health. So why do we design our cities for cars, asks Jeffrey Tumlin.
Good
July 23, 2013, 8am PDT
One of Manhattan's most popular tourist attractions, the linear, elevated urban park that existed as a freight rail line as late as 1980, is also a means of commuting to work - but only for walkers as cycling is prohibited along the High Line.
The New York Times - N.Y. / Region
June 13, 2013, 8am PDT
The research wing of the non-profit think tank Future Cape Town has produced an infographic that provides valuable insight into the mobility patterns found in some of Africa's largest cities. Less sustainable options are growing, raising concerns.
Future Cape Town
Blog post
May 19, 2013, 2am PDT
Planners must anticipate how people would respond to new options, such as better walking, cycling and public transit services. This requires imagination.
Todd Litman