Regulations

That question may seem like a contradiction, but it couldn't be more pertinent to communities and land use—existing codes and policies generate change by shaping investment.
Mar 6, 2015   Better Cities & Towns
The sledding ban on Capitol Hill was too much for Washington, D.C. residents to bear. They brought wintertime fun to Congress on yesterday's snow day.
Mar 6, 2015   The Hill
A guest column in the Dallas Morning News takes the Dallas political machine to task for delaying a new tree ordinance.
Jan 28, 2015   The Dallas Morning News
Cities simply can't afford the lawsuits that follow sledding injuries. Time will tell how strictly such laws are enforced.
Jan 11, 2015   Quartz
Texas Gov.-elect Greg Abbott takes aim at local regulations, exemplified by tree-cutting bans in cities like Houston and San Antonio.
Jan 9, 2015   The Houston Chronicle
Transportation network companies like Uber and Lyft took a major step toward legal recognition in Massachusetts.
Jan 6, 2015   The Boston Globe
Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Portland all filed suit against Uber recently hoping to bring the transportation network company in conformity with public safety regulations.
Dec 12, 2014   Los Angeles Times
While much of the concern of how to regulate transportation network companies like Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar comes down to questions about safety and access, recent findings show that the apps have reduced DUI arrests in the City of Brotherly Love.
Jul 9, 2014   PlanPhilly
After a failed attempt at similarly broad land use regulations failed in 2011, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is again undertaking an outreach process to create land use regulations along 72 miles of the Mississippi River.
Jul 5, 2014   Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune
Emily Badger focuses on the signifier at the middle of the ongoing battle between taxi companies and transportation network companies like Uber, Lfyt, and Sidecar—the taxi medallion.
Jun 24, 2014   The Washington Post - Wonkblog
A recent ruling that favored local homeowners over a developer in Houston had some wondering whether Houston's days as a "development free-for-all" were over. Fear not, says Stephen J. Smith.
Jun 3, 2014   Next City