Los Angeles

July 10, 2015, 8am PDT
A newly released proposal for overhauling Metro bus service in Los Angeles includes innovative and controversial measures. Included is a new metric for measuring the success of bus lines.
Human Transit
July 8, 2015, 9am PDT
Although the city of Los Angeles is well behind on the trend of adding a bikeshare of any variety, planners hope a recently proposed system will achieve more than the sum of its parts.
Los Angeles Times
July 4, 2015, 9am PDT
It makes economic sense: increase supply in desirable areas to match demand. These articles look at some of the factors complicating that story in on the west coast.
City Observatory City Commentary
July 2, 2015, 12pm PDT
Capturing the complexities and competing forces at play in major metro areas stumps many writers who face the challenge.
The Planning Report
June 26, 2015, 2pm PDT
The state of California, along with county and city officials, have taken several steps forward on plans and projects that could help Los Angeles wean itself from imported water.
Los Angeles Times
June 22, 2015, 2pm PDT
An article in Boom: A Journal of California extends the timeline of "smart cities" and "big data" efforts by a considerable amount—all the way back to the late 1960s.
BOOM: A Journal of California
June 21, 2015, 11am PDT
The Los Angeles City Council voted to allow the Los Angeles Streetcar project to begin preliminary engineering.
Urbanize LA
June 19, 2015, 12pm PDT
Developed using open data from local government sources, built: LA is a mapping tool that displays the age of every building in the county. Much of the area's built environment is surprisingly old.
CityLab
Feature
June 16, 2015, 5am PDT
A Planetizen review of "City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis," edited by Keith Gessen and Stephen Squibb, finds too much to fault in the book's essay about Los Angeles.
Josh Stephens
June 15, 2015, 6am PDT
The big market forces of Los Angeles long ignored Elysian Valley, colloquially called Frogtown. But now the neighborhood has hip cachet and residents are organizing to have a say as the area changes.
Los Angeles Review of Books
June 8, 2015, 8am PDT
By exiling short-term renters, the coastal city of Santa Monica shifts its housing burden onto neighboring areas. That burden, according to this op-ed, contradicts the city's sustainability commitment and further limits scarce residential options.
Santa Monica Daily Press
June 5, 2015, 11am PDT
Although Los Angeles isn't famous for its walking culture, many neighborhoods are actually quite suited for it. That is, if streets could be made friendlier to the pedestrians they currently repel.
Los Angeles Times
June 2, 2015, 10am PDT
Improvements funded by the developer of the 73-story Wilshire Grand project will make Downtown Los Angeles' main thoroughfare a better place to walk, bike, and use public transit.
Urbanize LA
June 1, 2015, 10am PDT
As the country's industrial past fades, cities are finding new meaning in their rivers—from the meandering to the mighty.
ASLA The Dirt
May 30, 2015, 9am PDT
A "water atlas" compiled by UCLA's Luskin Center for Innovation reveals the patchwork that is Los Angeles' water supply system. Neighborhoods reliant on small providers and groundwater sources may be vulnerable.
CityLab
May 29, 2015, 2pm PDT
Although unemployment has declined, according to this report commutes are getting longer. "Job sprawl" often plagues minority and poor areas where housing is more affordable.
Al Jazeera America
May 28, 2015, 9am PDT
Los Angeles will raise its minimum wage incrementally to $15 an hour by 2020. But with an inadequate supply of new housing, will this new spending power simply enable landlords to charge more? Some economists say yes.
KPCC
May 17, 2015, 9am PDT
A series of public outreach events are being held in Pershing Square to determine how to make the park more engaging. Live music and fewer physical barriers to entry are among the ideas suggested.
LA Downtown News
May 15, 2015, 8am PDT
By many estimates, a city known for its pedestrian unfriendliness is developing pockets of local walkability. Minor disputes over pedestrian rights may add up to something bigger.
CityLab
May 12, 2015, 2pm PDT
Yes, there was a conspiracy led by General Motors to replace streetcars with their buses in the 1930s. But streetcars were dying well before then, due to competition with the automobile and other reasons apart from nefarious corporate collusions.
Vox