Central and South America

Cuba and its capital city of Havana are experiencing several, simultaneous revolutions. The opportunity for residents is also an opportunity for developers and architects, as well as a challenge for planners.
Feb 2, 2016   The Guardian Cities
Long abused by those who favor more urban settings, the suburbs of major metropolitan areas should receive more credit for their cultural capital, according to this article written for Zócalo Public Square.
Jan 26, 2016   Zocalo Public Square
The awarding of the Pritzker Prize to the 48-year-old Alejandro Aravena sends a strong signal about the architecture world's focus on social responsibility.
Jan 13, 2016   Curbed
This is cool: a Brazilian publisher created pocket books that double as transit tickets—and gave away 10,000 of them, each loaded with ten free transit rides.
Jan 7, 2016   Open Culture
The world lacks any significant number of museums focused primarily on the issues of planning. Rio de Janeiro, however, will soon add one to the inventory.
Dec 20, 2015   Next City
Mexico City is considering a novel transit idea: two-person gondolas gliding along an aerial track. The costs of such a system may be far lower than extending the subway system.
Dec 5, 2015   Quartz
With water shortages in São Paulo making headlines around the world, Brazil is rethinking its approach to water infrastructure. Arup's Pablo Lazo gives his perspective on the various entities that are acting for change.
Nov 23, 2015   Doggerel
Where pedestrian-only streets have failed to draw business, the problem may be a failure to think big enough.
Sep 15, 2015   The Globe and Mail
A study of two cities at opposite ends of the urban spectrum demonstrate how density matters for a number of ecological services.
Sep 4, 2015   Pacific Standard
Interested in finding the road less traveled by? Walkonomics has launched in seven cities around the globe.
Jul 25, 2015   ASLA The Dirt
Evidence is building up that the Brazil's extravagant spending on the World Cup soccer championships last year won’t have the last positive impacts promised by government officials. Next up for Brazil: the Olympics.
May 13, 2015   NPR