Social / Demographics

June 12, 2016, 1pm PDT
A photo series documents some of the many different U.S. streets named to honor MLK.
CityLab
June 10, 2016, 9am PDT
As cities around the U.S. scramble to figure out how to address the housing affordability crisis, one of them has now leaned on the benevolence of what some consider the least benevolent of them all.
Shelterforce/Rooflines
June 10, 2016, 8am PDT
South L.A.'s inclusion in the Promise Zones program marks a shift in the way the federal government measures poverty.
LA Streetsblog
Feature
June 8, 2016, 7am PDT
The debate about whether Millennials prefer urban or suburban misses a big, important point: what Millennials really prefer is possible in either setting.
Ben Cummins
June 7, 2016, 10am PDT
Without children at the center of activity, the urban neighborhoods of today offer little compared to the ideals expressed by Jane Jacobs, according to this strongly worded critique of contemporary urbanism.
The American Conservative
June 6, 2016, 7am PDT
As more cities attempt to crackdown on homelessness, legal fights have broken out as advocates for the homeless fight back against the criminalization of panhandling and camping in public.
The Washington Post
June 5, 2016, 1pm PDT
New Mexico had the nation's highest pedestrian fatality rate in 2014. Alcohol was a factor in over half the pedestrian fatalities in New Mexico, while nationally it's a third. According to the Albuquerque PD, drunk pedestrians are primarily to blame.
Albuquerque Journal
June 4, 2016, 1pm PDT
In May, the documentary film "Cleveland: Confronting Decline in an American City" was made available in full on YouTube.
Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
June 2, 2016, 7am PDT
A program in Boston to "enliven and strengthen" the arts and creativity in the city's diverse neighborhoods employed artists to seek out and define how people interact with art in their community.
Barr Foundation
June 1, 2016, 1pm PDT
The state of Texas is expected to double its population between 2010 and 2050. Just how, though, is worthy of more scrutiny.
The Dallas Morning News
June 1, 2016, 11am PDT
Now that tech companies have "discovered" Portland, Oregon, longtime residents question whether the progressive city has done enough to protect them from displacement. Sound familiar?
The Atlantic
June 1, 2016, 8am PDT
An op-ed in the New York Times makes a cogent case for increasing movement between states for self-betterment, specifically from high unemployment states to states like New Hampshire and North Dakota, and what policy changes would encourage it.
The New York Times
June 1, 2016, 6am PDT
NYCxDESIGN, New York City’s annual celebration of design, recently wrapped up its fourth season. To learn more about who makes up the design community, photographer Charles Aydlett asked attendees how they would like to see design evolve in the city.
Doggerel
May 31, 2016, 7am PDT
As is so often the case worldwide, many Parisians live in communities distinguished by class. The city government wants to change that by inserting thousands of public housing units in wealthy central districts.
CityLab
May 31, 2016, 6am PDT
On average, women spend longer in traffic than men—perhaps because of the gendered division of labor that still exists in many households.
Pacific Standard
May 30, 2016, 1pm PDT
How can the New Urban Agenda respect the elderly—and make cities better for all of us in the process?
Next City
May 27, 2016, 2pm PDT
Planetizen Managing Editor James Brasuell shares some of the biggest news and announcements from the week in planning, land use, and related topics.
Planetizen
May 25, 2016, 11am PDT
In the spirit of civic self-congratulation, Austin resident Richard Parker writes about how the transportation network company giants canceled service after losing a referendum vote. He ascribes this victory to the city's enduring contrarian streak.
The New York Times
May 25, 2016, 6am PDT
Gustav Milne makes a simple argument via The Guardian: urbanization "is bad for us."
The Guardian
May 25, 2016, 5am PDT
A Pew Research Center analysis of Census Data reveals a fundamental shift in the way U.S. residents are living—last true in a time closer to the Civil War than the 20th century.
Pew Research Center