New AARP Study Finds Older Americans Redefining 'Livable'

"People in the United States are getting older. But increasingly, they don't want to live in some old folks' community," writes Sarah Goodyear. As the number of Americans over 65 grows, concepts like aging in place are gaining new pertinence.
April 28, 2014, 9am PDT | James Brasuell | @CasualBrasuell
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Sarah Goodyear shares news of a new study by the AARP, which explores the changing needs and desires of aging Americans, especially with regard to where they live.

"The report surveyed more than 4,500 people from a wide range of income groups, ethnicities, and types of community, and found that 71 percent of those surveyed between the ages of 50 and 64 want to continue living where they are. Eighty-seven percent of those over 65 want to remain in their current homes," writes Goodyear. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many of the study identifies commonalities between the desires of Millennials for less car-centric lifestyles and similar desires among the older generations.

The report is part of a larger AARP effort to create a "livability index" to measure how well neighborhoods meet the needs of aging populations. 

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Published on Friday, April 25, 2014 in Atlantic Cities
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