Researchers Link Density, Destinations to Active Transportation Habits

What, exactly, makes a neighborhood walkable? A new study published in the science journal PLOS-ONE begins to answer that question.

The researchers looked at four factors—street connectivity, population density, residential density, and the number of nearby non-residential destinations—in relationship to Toronto residents’ walking habits.  They found that the last three factors (population density, residential density, and walkable destinations) most strongly predicted walking activity.  Street connectivity had a lower impact on transportation habits.

“Basically, if you live in a dense area, you are more likely to walk and bike often, and you’re even more likely to get physical activity if there are a lot of destinations close to your house,” Angie Schmitt writes.

Full Story: What Sets Apart the Places Where People Walk More?

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