Chicago's Ubiquitous Housing Type Turns 100

As Chicago's population surged in the second decade of the 20th century, one dominant single-family housing type spread across the city. Over the next year the Historic Chicago Bungalow Association will celebrate these distinctive homes.
David Wilson / Flickr

"Other places have their bungalows -- California, Michigan, Milwaukee," observes Robin Amer. "But in Chicago a bungalow has come to mean a single-family home, one-and-a-half stories tall, longer than it is wide, built between 1910 and 1940. It is made of brick -- yellow ochre, russet, deep red, whatever -- usually with stone trim. It has a low-pitched roof with overhanging eaves, a full basement and a front entrance that's set off to the side."

"There are more than 80,000 bungalows in Chicago, making them a critical part of the city's architectural landscape as well as accounting for 'nearly one-third of the city's single-family housing stock,'" adds Amer. 

With a series of exhibitions to be held this spring, the Historic Chicago Bungalow Association will celebrate the 100th birthday of the city's ubiquitous housing type. 

Full Story: 100 years of Chicago bungalows


Brand new! Urban Grid City Collection

Each city has its own unique story. Commemorate where you came from or where you want to go.
Grids and Guide Red book cover

Grids & Guides

A notebook for visual thinkers. Available in red and black.
Wood necklace with city map

City Necklaces

These sweet pendants are engraved on a cedar charm with a mini map of selected cities. The perfect gift for friends and family or yourself!

Get the "Green Bible" of educational planning books

Understand the complexities of planning at the local level while preparing for the AICP* exam. Find out why this edition is included in the APA's recommended reading list.