Farms Become the Latest Must-Have Suburban Amenity

Forget about golf courses and swimming pools, says Luke Runyon, developers are drawing in residents by integrating fully functioning farms into their new neighborhoods.

Runyon looks at the trend in "development-supported agriculture, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture — a farm-share program commonly known as CSA."

"In planning a new neighborhood," he explains, "a developer includes some form of food production — a farm, community garden, orchard, livestock operation, edible park — that is meant to draw in new buyers, increase values and stitch neighbors together."

"'These projects are becoming more and more mainstream,' says Ed McMahon, a fellow with the Urban Land Institute. He estimates that more than 200 developments with an agricultural twist already exist nationwide."

Full Story: Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

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