Obama Signs Resilience Order

In an acknowledgement that significant climate change is a real and growing threat (and unlikely to be averted), President Obama will direct federal agencies to make it easier for localities plan for, and adapt to, a warming planet.

"White House aides said President Obama would sign an executive order on Friday morning directing federal agencies to make it easier for states and communities to build resilience against storms, droughts and other weather extremes," reports Justin Gillis.

"In addition, the White House will set up a high-level task force of state and local leaders to offer advice to the federal government. At least six governors — all Democrats — have agreed to serve, along with mayors and other local leaders representing both political parties. The plan also calls for better coordination among federal agencies." 

"Some communities trying to incorporate climate change into their planning have long complained that they have trouble getting authoritative data and predictions from the federal government," adds Gillis. "[John P. Holdren, the president’s science adviser] said the administration’s plan would include a web portal to make such information more accessible."

Full Story: White House Will Focus on Climate Shifts While Trying to Cut Greenhouse Gases


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