Is the Urban Swing the New Thing?

From Austin to Copenhagen, swings of varying shapes and sizes are adding a bit of whimsy, refreshment, and visual interest to urban environments. And they're not just for children!
art_inthecity / flickr

"It is hard to write about swings without sounding cheesy," admits Jillian Glover, "but there is something about being on a swing that offers the experience of pure joy and freedom. Swings can transform a mundane environment (like a bus shelter, abandoned alley, etc.) into an opportunity to play. This feeling is typically reserved for children, but architects, urbanists and artists are bringing swings to the city in creative, playful installations for everyone to enjoy."

Glover looks at nine examples of swinging cities. 

Full Story: Swinging in the City
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