Los Angeles Lifts Ban On Public Murals

By a 13-2 vote, the Los Angeles City Council lifted an unevenly applied decade-long ban on public murals on Wednesday, ending a dark period for a city that had long celebrated its social and cultural identity on public walls.
August 30, 2013, 10am PDT | Jonathan Nettler | @nettsj
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"The new rules, which must come back for an expected final approval next week, will permit new murals in business and industrial zones as long as artists register projects with the city and pay a $60 application fee," reports Catherine Saillant. "Commercial messages are prohibited and works must remain for at least two years as part of the city effort to control advertising."

"The decision culminates years of debate over how Los Angeles should regulate murals, which have chronicled generations of the city's history, from the mid-20th century struggles of Latinos on the Eastside to freeway displays celebrating the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics," she notes.

"'Murals are part and parcel of the social and cultural and historic fabric of the city,'' said Councilman Gil Cedillo, who represents mural-rich areas of the Eastside. 'We should recognize that.'"


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Published on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 in Los Angeles Times
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